Pass Information Like a Spy with Dead Drops

by February 10, 2010 02/10/10
Dead Drop

The first rule of Spying is, “You don’t talk about Spy Club!”

Ok, seriously though… Every good Spy knows how to exchange messages secretly, and that meeting your contact openly is dangerous!

So how can you pass messages secretly? With one of the two Dead Drop Devices we’ll be reviewing today from Spy-Coins.com

A Dead Drop is simply an agreed upon spot where you or your contact can leave a message for the other without actually meeting in person.

These are typically used in conjunction with a “Signpost,” or a place to leave a signal that the message has been dropped.

Perhaps the most famous use of a Dead Drop is by CIA Mole Aldrich Ames during the late 80s to communicate with his Russian counterparts.

The two Dead Drop Devices we’re reviewing fall into a Covert or Overt category.

Covert Dead Drop

Dead Drop DevicesThe definition of a Covert Dead Drop would be using a drop that is concealed from the everyday line of sight, and the Dead Drop Spike is a perfect example of this.

Machined from a solid billet of 3/4″ diameter aluminum, measuring 5 3/4″ long. It features a removable, threaded  top and has an o-ring seal to keep its contents waterproof.

The exterior is painted with a black abrasive resistant finish, but we wound up marring it a bit when we overtightened it and had to use a vice to open it back up.

Dead Drop DevicesOur suggestion on these is to apply some WD-40 to the thread to help keep it lubricated and avoid the mistake we made.

The Dead Drop Spike can be pressed into soft ground to later be picked up by your contact, and has a leather strap to help aid in getting it out.

This is definitely not something you want to carry in your pocket, as the tip of the spike is very sharp and could easily serve as an improvised weapon in a pinch.

Overt Dead Drop

Dead Drop DevicesThe definition of an Overt Dead Drop would be using a drop that’s disguised as an everyday item and wouldn’t be given a second thought if properly placed in its environment.

What better everyday item to use then a Hollow Spy Bolt?  This 5/8″ diameter steel bot has been hollowed out and features a threaded, removable head. It’s approximately 2.5″ long.

Dead Drop DevicesThey have also been experimenting with a left hand opening bolt (clockwise), as the current design is a standard counter-clockwise opening that’s easily accessed if someone suspects your bolt.

The threading, tapering and hollowing of the bolt are very solid and well made just like all the products we’ve had the pleasure of reviewing from Spy-Coins.com

All products from Deru & Sons Mfg. Co. are proudly made in the USA.


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Alex
Alex

These things are pretty cool. As I mentioned in the coin post, I am an Intel major and study both our country's intelligence failures as well as its successes. Robert Hanssen, the FBI mole, used dead drops exclusively to pass off his myriad secrets to the Russians. He passed off his secrets in large bulk documents and on "gasp" floppy disks. His method was garbage bags under a bridge.

However, in today's world of thumb drives and memory cards I would imagine that a memory card or a small USB drive could fit inside the bolt or the spike. As a cop, I could see where I would be fooled by the left-hand turn bolt head. I guess I will be twisting random large bolts both ways.

Alex
Alex

These things are pretty cool. As I mentioned in the coin post, I am an Intel major and study both our country's intelligence failures as well as its successes. Robert Hanssen, the FBI mole, used dead drops exclusively to pass off his myriad secrets to the Russians. He passed off his secrets in large bulk documents and on "gasp" floppy disks. His method was garbage bags under a bridge. However, in today's world of thumb drives and memory cards I would imagine that a memory card or a small USB drive could fit inside the bolt or the spike. As a cop, I could see where I would be fooled by the left-hand turn bolt head. I guess I will be twisting random large bolts both ways.

Blake Mims
Blake Mims

The bolt is ingenious. The coins can be (ACTUALLY) accidentaly spent and the spike is suspicious to LEOs, other spies, or whoever's profesional enough to be looking for your information. But in the average guy's pile of junk who's going to suspect a random bolt?

Failure Drill
Failure Drill

Tthe bolt is something else I am going to have to look for when I search vehicles/persons...Thanks for the info and I will pass this on to other LEO's

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