Developing Your Every Day Carry Kit

by October 21, 2009 10/21/09
P1130036
I’d like to thank ITS Tactical for providing the opportunity to share knowledge amongst us readers. Hopefully you find this article helpful.
What should you carry in your EDC kit? It depends. I can’t give you the answer, but I’ll try to help you to start thinking about it.
Before we start, it is important to know that an EDC kit is not a Survival Kit or a Bug Out Bag. It should consist of just the basic items to help you answer quickly to situations that could arise during your day. According to my philosophy, an EDC kit should contain the fewer items you can afford to carry. You use your pistol to get to your rifle, and an EDC kit should serve the same purpose. It should serve your needs until you get home, get to your car or get some help.
First of all, assess your environment. Do you live in a tornado area? Or perhaps in an earthquake prone zone? Do you have to drive long distances to get to work or will you stay a few blocks away from home? All this questions (and any other you can ask yourself) will help you to determine your needs. I guess what I’m trying to say is why carry a fully fledged 1st aid kit if you will spend your day only a few minutes away from a hospital?
In my case (and I write this down just as an example) I do live in an area that has been hit by earthquakes and that could potentially be hit by a tsunami. We have occasional storms and landslides. There is a growing danger of violent riots, especially on certain dates along the year. Also I work 40 minutes away from home, so there is the possibility of a car breakdown or witnessing a car crash on the highway. These are my potential needs. What are yours?
Once you are clear about your needs, it’s time to plan how you will face them. What tools will you need in case these situations arise? Don’t limit yourself to emergency situations. Are there any tasks you do normally that would benefit from having a certain item with you?
So now you have your needs, and the tools you could use. Step three is thinking about how you’re going to carry those tools. Will you use your pockets? A carabineer? A fanny pack? Perhaps you can carry a small backpack. How about your cars glove compartment?
Only after you have determined your needs and your resources (space available and capability of weight carrying), you can start building your EDC kit. Don’t just jump and buy stuff because someone else has it in his kit you saw on Youtube. Be smart. Think about how you will use your tools. Perhaps there are some tools that can perform more than one task. Remember, you have limited space available, and any weight you can avoid is bad weight. Remove everything that has no real purpose or anything you really don’t see yourself using. Now you are ready to pack your gear. Place it in a logical manner. Things you will use more often should be more accessible.
Summarizing, don’t start building your kit based on the tools. Start with your needs. Once you know your needs, you will know what tools to take with you and what tools should stay at home. Practice with your gear. Find new uses for it. The more you know, the more practice you have, the lesser tools you will have to carry. A good exercise is asking to yourself: “If I could only carry 3 items, what would they be?”  Remember to keep revisiting your kit. If you’re doing something unusual, or going to a different place, perhaps your normal tools won’t be of any use.
So, do you already have an EDC kit? What are your needs and how do you address them? Post your experience!

P1130036What should you carry in your EDC kit? I can’t give you the definitive answer, but I’ll try to help you start thinking about what you’ll need.

Before we start, it is important to know that an EDC kit is not a Survival Kit or a Bug Out Bag. It should consist of just the basic items you’ll need to help you quickly respond to situations that could arise during your day.

An EDC kit should be as light and small as possible. You use your pistol to get to your rifle, and an EDC kit should serve the same purpose. It should serve your needs until you get home, get to your car or get some help.

Assessing Your Environment

First of all, assess your environment. Do you live in a tornado area? Or perhaps in an earthquake prone zone? Do you have to drive long distances to get to work or will you stay a few blocks away from home?

All these questions (and any others you can ask yourself) will help you to determine your needs. What I’m trying to say is, why carry a fully stocked first aid kit if you will spend your day only a few minutes away from a hospital?

In my case (and I write this down just as an example) I do live in an area that has been hit by earthquakes and that could potentially be hit by a tsunami. We have occasional storms and landslides, as well as a growing danger of violent riots, especially on certain days of the year.

Also, I work 40 minutes away from home, so there is the possibility of a car breakdown or witnessing a car crash on the highway. These are my potential needs, what are yours?

Selecting Your Tools

Once you’re clear about your needs, it’s time to plan how you will handle them. What tools will you need in case these situations arise?

Don’t limit yourself to emergency situations, are there any tasks you do normally that would benefit from having a certain item with you?

Be smart and think about how you will use your tools, don’t just rush to buy things because someone else has them in their kit you saw on YouTube.

Perhaps there are some tools that can perform more than one task. Remember, you have limited space available, and any weight you can avoid is bad weight.

Carrying Your Gear

So now you have your needs, and the potential tools you could use. Step three is thinking about how you’re going to carry those tools.

Will you use your pockets? A carabineer? A fanny pack? Perhaps you can carry a small backpack. How about your car’s glove compartment?

Only after you’ve determined your needs and your resources (space available and capability of weight carrying), can you start building your EDC kit.

Remove everything that has no real purpose or anything you really don’t see yourself using.

When packing your gear, place it in a logical manner with things you will use more often being more accessible.

Summary

Don’t start building your kit based on the tools, start with your needs. Once you know your needs, you will know what tools to take with you and what tools should stay at home.

Practice with your gear, find new uses for it. The more you know, and the more practice you have, the less tools you will have to carry. A good exercise is asking to yourself “If I could only carry 3 items, what would they be?”

Remember to keep revisiting your kit. If you’re doing something unusual, or going to a different place, perhaps your normal tools need to be reconsidered.

So, do you already have an EDC kit? What are your needs and how do you address them? Post your experiences!

TJK is an Engineer living in Chile, a Boy Scout for almost 10 years and a Volunteer Firefighter for seven years. We’d like to thank him for taking the time to write a guest post for ITS Tactical!

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social media

Magnificent goods from you, man. I have understand your stuff prior to and you are simply

too great. I actually like what you have received here, certainly like what you're saying and the best way by which you are saying it. You're making it entertaining and you still take care of to keep it sensible. I cant wait to read much more from you. This is actually a great site.

social media
social media

Magnificent goods from you, man. I have understand your stuff prior to and you are simply too great. I actually like what you have received here, certainly like what you're saying and the best way by which you are saying it. You're making it entertaining and you still take care of to keep it sensible. I cant wait to read much more from you. This is actually a great site.

Steve Lee
Steve Lee

Don't forget strong, broken-in walking shoes or boots. No shoes and you're sunk, no matter the pack you carry.

And if you are blond or bald like me, simple head protection is more important than.

Steve Lee
Steve Lee

Don't forget strong, broken-in walking shoes or boots. No shoes and you're sunk, no matter the pack you carry. And if you are blond or bald like me, simple head protection is more important than.

Brandon Hooper
Brandon Hooper

I used to have an EDC bag i carried with me with all my essentials until it was stolen right out of my ambulance while I was at work and in the hospital with a patient. So now I am working on getting another one started since I am out of work right now and roam around all day to different parts of the city and hills. Some stuff I will have to do without, like a handgun because getting a carry permit here is like finding someone who has been to Atlantis, but I can carry my knife and other essentials so I'll have a new pack shortly and post pics and a list when it's done.

Mischief
Mischief

Interesting lists. The one thing I always have which is missing from these lists? Maps. Street level, state, and sometimes regional. Normal carry includes rapid access folding knife, tac lite, meds, cash. The rest is a prepared mind.

Greg Simon
Greg Simon

Great Post.

As with EDC, the tools you carry in your head need to be considered as well. How is your first aid training? One additional suggestion would be to take a first responder course and then practice those skill every 3 to 6 months?

Greg Simon
Greg Simon

Great Post. As with EDC, the tools you carry in your head need to be considered as well. How is your first aid training? One additional suggestion would be to take a first responder course and then practice those skill every 3 to 6 months?

Blake Mims
Blake Mims

oops meant 3. The big 3 causes of death in the field.

Blake Mims
Blake Mims

wow... im a civilian with no more than Boy Scouting experiance, but some of those lists seem ridiculously long... I've gotten by fine so far with a "tactical" folding knife, lighter, cell phone, and wallet with money/ID/credit card. Then again, I'm a suburban ranger, and could be in a dense urban area or the middle of nowhere in less than 30 minute. Just turned 21 recently, so I'm looking at adding a handgun and (thanks to this site) a credit-card lock-pick set. A lot of the stuff yall put up here sounds like it would be a pain to lug around, and probably gets left in the car. Like a first aid kit. Good idea for all of you guys on active duty, but if I'm more than 2 minutes away from my car than I'm, as they like to say on teh interwebz, "DOING IT WRONG." I will say that I will be stealing some of the ideas I've heard on here, like replacing shoe strings with paracord and getting a blow out kit. 'Cause my first aid kit doesn't have any of the things that are in there, and when I realized that I couldn't believe it. I've got a FIRST AID KIT, and it doesn't have crucial items for the big 2 causes of death: something to promote clotting, a tube to assist breathing, or a needle to relieve pressure. Deffinitely ordering one ASAP

MIke P
MIke P

@ke4sky Thanks for sharing your list. I live in Alexandria and work in DC (just a few blocks from the Capital) and I'm starting to really put a good list together for both EDC and some emergency preparedness. It sometimes slips my mind at the location I'm actually in and that preparation is a must. I'm not in Kansas anymore!

ke4sky
ke4sky

Today I am working in my office, near Washington, DC. I thought I'd run through my EDC right now.

Proton Microlight II on ID chain

REI thermometer on coat zipper pull

Wrist watch with Suunto clipper compass on the watchband

Cell phone in my pocket

Streamlight Nanolight on my keyring

Sparklight fire striker on keyring

Fox 40 whistle on keyring

Mil-K-818 utility knife in coat pocket

BeltGlideASE fresnel lens in wallet

Motorola XTS3000 Agency radio on belt.

Aviator's helmet bag in locked m my desk drawer has a Dymed First Responder first aid kit, 2 liters of water, 2 MREs, poncho, fleece pullover, gloves, VS-17 signal panel and an AM/FM portable radio.

ke4sky
ke4sky

Today I am working in my office, near Washington, DC. I thought I'd run through my EDC right now. Proton Microlight II on ID chain REI thermometer on coat zipper pull Wrist watch with Suunto clipper compass on the watchband Cell phone in my pocket Streamlight Nanolight on my keyring Sparklight fire striker on keyring Fox 40 whistle on keyring Mil-K-818 utility knife in coat pocket BeltGlideASE fresnel lens in wallet Motorola XTS3000 Agency radio on belt. Aviator's helmet bag in locked m my desk drawer has a Dymed First Responder first aid kit, 2 liters of water, 2 MREs, poncho, fleece pullover, gloves, VS-17 signal panel and an AM/FM portable radio.

Aaron JF
Aaron JF

Before you read what all I carry I am going to go ahead now and fully admit I am a gear geek. I ended up breaking my kit into three. I started with only caring items on my person that I felt I could get through dam near anything with if I had to. My EDC is stuff that falls under the "could happen" and a couple of nice to have items. My car bag is anything that was "nice to have" or spares that I did not want to lug around in my EDC Bag. I bought a bag that matched the color of my carpet and stuck it under a back seat.

1) Pockets/Person.

��CPR Face Shield and Nitrile Gloves in a sealed plastic bag.

��Leatherman Wave

� Kershaw Knives Tanto Blur (Sometimes)

��Zippo

��A lock pick and tension wrench. More for fun than anything, but has come in handy more than twice in the last year.

��Surefire E1L Outdoorsman or Fenix E01 depending on the pants/shorts I am wearing.

��Sig Sauer P239T 9

2) EDC Bag

��Maxpedition Last Resort Tactical Attache

��CamelBak Better Bottle - 32oz

��Surefire L4 LumaMax

��2 Glo Sticks

��4 pack of CR123 Batteries

� 4 pack of AA Batteries

��2 Spare car alarm remote batteries

� Extra car charging cable for my phone

� 2 Cliff Bars

��compact first aid & CPR kit

� Bit Set for Leatherman

� Right In The Rain note pad and pen

� Sharpie duo tip

� 100' pack of Paracord

��Windmill Butane Lighter

� Bic Disposable Lighter

� Mylar Emergency Sleeping Bag

��One spare magazine for each gun

� Sig Sauer P229 40. Before you ask why I carry two. I carry my gun in an Small Of Back Holster. When sitting in my truck it is slow to get to. The one in the bag at this point is much easier to get to. A good portion of my daily driving is through a very depressed urban area in a city with a very high crime rate.

3) Truck "Extra Gear" Bag

� Bic Disposable Lighter

��WetFire Tinder 4 Pack

��Magnesium Firestarting Tool (I may watch to much survivor man)

��Spare Leatherman wave

��Spare Leatherman Bit Set

��25 Rounds of 9mm

� 25 Rounds of 40

��4 Glo Sticks

��MagLite Mini 2-AA Flashlight

��LED Headlamp

��4 pack of CR123 Batteries

� 4 pack of AA Batteries

� 4 pack of AAA Batteries

��2 Spare car alarm remote batteries

� 4 Cliff Bars

� 4 Mylar Emergency Sleeping Bags

��2 Packs of Cigarets

��2 Packs of gum

��Signal Mirror

� Compass

� Swiss Army Knife

� 100' paracord

��Spare Tire Gage

� Spare Car Fuses

� 32oz Stainless steel water bottle with water

� Red Cross Deluxe Family First Aid Kit

��Tampons (Good for Fiancees and bullet wounds)

Aaron JF
Aaron JF

Before you read what all I carry I am going to go ahead now and fully admit I am a gear geek. I ended up breaking my kit into three. I started with only caring items on my person that I felt I could get through dam near anything with if I had to. My EDC is stuff that falls under the "could happen" and a couple of nice to have items. My car bag is anything that was "nice to have" or spares that I did not want to lug around in my EDC Bag. I bought a bag that matched the color of my carpet and stuck it under a back seat. 1) Pockets/Person. ��CPR Face Shield and Nitrile Gloves in a sealed plastic bag. ��Leatherman Wave � Kershaw Knives Tanto Blur (Sometimes) ��Zippo ��A lock pick and tension wrench. More for fun than anything, but has come in handy more than twice in the last year. ��Surefire E1L Outdoorsman or Fenix E01 depending on the pants/shorts I am wearing. ��Sig Sauer P239T 9 2) EDC Bag ��Maxpedition Last Resort Tactical Attache ��CamelBak Better Bottle - 32oz ��Surefire L4 LumaMax ��2 Glo Sticks ��4 pack of CR123 Batteries � 4 pack of AA Batteries ��2 Spare car alarm remote batteries � Extra car charging cable for my phone � 2 Cliff Bars ��compact first aid & CPR kit � Bit Set for Leatherman � Right In The Rain note pad and pen � Sharpie duo tip � 100' pack of Paracord ��Windmill Butane Lighter � Bic Disposable Lighter � Mylar Emergency Sleeping Bag ��One spare magazine for each gun � Sig Sauer P229 40. Before you ask why I carry two. I carry my gun in an Small Of Back Holster. When sitting in my truck it is slow to get to. The one in the bag at this point is much easier to get to. A good portion of my daily driving is through a very depressed urban area in a city with a very high crime rate. 3) Truck "Extra Gear" Bag � Bic Disposable Lighter ��WetFire Tinder 4 Pack ��Magnesium Firestarting Tool (I may watch to much survivor man) ��Spare Leatherman wave ��Spare Leatherman Bit Set ��25 Rounds of 9mm � 25 Rounds of 40 ��4 Glo Sticks ��MagLite Mini 2-AA Flashlight ��LED Headlamp ��4 pack of CR123 Batteries � 4 pack of AA Batteries � 4 pack of AAA Batteries ��2 Spare car alarm remote batteries � 4 Cliff Bars � 4 Mylar Emergency Sleeping Bags ��2 Packs of Cigarets ��2 Packs of gum ��Signal Mirror � Compass � Swiss Army Knife � 100' paracord ��Spare Tire Gage � Spare Car Fuses � 32oz Stainless steel water bottle with water � Red Cross Deluxe Family First Aid Kit ��Tampons (Good for Fiancees and bullet wounds)

TJK
TJK

Great to see this response to the post.

The items shown on the picture are:

-1 white rag (6x3 feet): multipurpose, mostly for First Aid

-1 CPR microshield: perform CPR without risk of infections

-1 pair latex gloves (inside the CPR microshield pouch)

-1 wallet with emergency money (that I never touch) and ID

-6 feet of 550 cord

-1 OC canister (firearm carrying is not allowed here)

-1 cell phone, charged daily

-1 Fenix PD30 flashlight

-1 SwissTool Multitool (the model with the bits, not pictured)

-1 Victorinox Soldier pocketknife

-1 Folding knife

-1 lighter

-Duct tape

Not pictured: First aid kit, containing:

-aspirin

-alcohol swabs

-bandaids

-3M adhesive bandage

-tweezers

-anti-acid

TJK
TJK

Great to see this response to the post. The items shown on the picture are: -1 white rag (6x3 feet): multipurpose, mostly for First Aid -1 CPR microshield: perform CPR without risk of infections -1 pair latex gloves (inside the CPR microshield pouch) -1 wallet with emergency money (that I never touch) and ID -6 feet of 550 cord -1 OC canister (firearm carrying is not allowed here) -1 cell phone, charged daily -1 Fenix PD30 flashlight -1 SwissTool Multitool (the model with the bits, not pictured) -1 Victorinox Soldier pocketknife -1 Folding knife -1 lighter -Duct tape Not pictured: First aid kit, containing: -aspirin -alcohol swabs -bandaids -3M adhesive bandage -tweezers -anti-acid

nukefaith
nukefaith

Im living in an urban environment, Berlin in germany to be precise. I have a black Eagle A3 backpack i often carry with me. It has a gerber tool, a petzl headlight and a surefire 6p with cree LED head in it. Furthermore it has compressed gauze, a control wrap, face shield and exam gloves in it. To top it off it has a watch cap, oakley m-frame set and a pair of mechanix fastfit gloves too.

But basicly i stick to the following item i always have with me:

Beyond softshell jacket;

Exam gloves;

Face shield;

Fisher space pen;

Mobile phone with camera;

ID, bankcard etc;

Change;

I have already order a Crye Visor Light to add to my EDC kit.

Vodoo, i like that idea about the "give-away-wallet".

Besides all that im trying to be ready for the unknown with crossit and also started krav maga on monday.

nukefaith
nukefaith

Im living in an urban environment, Berlin in germany to be precise. I have a black Eagle A3 backpack i often carry with me. It has a gerber tool, a petzl headlight and a surefire 6p with cree LED head in it. Furthermore it has compressed gauze, a control wrap, face shield and exam gloves in it. To top it off it has a watch cap, oakley m-frame set and a pair of mechanix fastfit gloves too. But basicly i stick to the following item i always have with me: Beyond softshell jacket; Exam gloves; Face shield; Fisher space pen; Mobile phone with camera; ID, bankcard etc; Change; I have already order a Crye Visor Light to add to my EDC kit. Vodoo, i like that idea about the "give-away-wallet". Besides all that im trying to be ready for the unknown with crossit and also started krav maga on monday.

Ed
Ed

I usually carry the following on my person:

1x Leatherman Wave

1x Leatherman Squirt E4

1x Swiss Tech Utilikey

1x Surefire G2L flashlight

2x 123A Lithium batteries

I also carry a small first aid kit that I've tailored for the small cuts and what not I tend to get at work. It has band aids of various sizes, a pair of latex gloves, and some PEpto Bismol chewable tablets. Its all contained in an Aloksak bag.

I also carry a Camelbak HAWG to work, it has a length of 550 para cord, an MRE, and my Icom radio. I also have a poncho depending on whether or not it is monsoon season.

Ed
Ed

I usually carry the following on my person: 1x Leatherman Wave 1x Leatherman Squirt E4 1x Swiss Tech Utilikey 1x Surefire G2L flashlight 2x 123A Lithium batteries I also carry a small first aid kit that I've tailored for the small cuts and what not I tend to get at work. It has band aids of various sizes, a pair of latex gloves, and some PEpto Bismol chewable tablets. Its all contained in an Aloksak bag. I also carry a Camelbak HAWG to work, it has a length of 550 para cord, an MRE, and my Icom radio. I also have a poncho depending on whether or not it is monsoon season.

kenpojitsu
kenpojitsu

Its nice to see that Im not the only one that thinks about this. I sometimes catch shit for being the over prepared Guy.

I just put together a new kit that fits in my Cargo Pocket. its a little bulky so Im trying to scale it down a bit. But at the very least I bring My Pocket knife & a Flashlight with me when I leave the house.I also have a small Maxpedition pouch that I keep Rubber gloves & a few Bandaids that also goes with me.

I have a pretty good First aid kit I put into a Molle Butt pack that stays in my care trunk. along with a Big Tupperware container that can go from car to car. juts in case of an extended Breakdown in the Hills or elsewhere. It even has extra food for the Dog. Its about time to re-organize all the stuff & thanks to this Article for reminding me to do so!!

kenpojitsu
kenpojitsu

Its nice to see that Im not the only one that thinks about this. I sometimes catch shit for being the over prepared Guy. I just put together a new kit that fits in my Cargo Pocket. its a little bulky so Im trying to scale it down a bit. But at the very least I bring My Pocket knife & a Flashlight with me when I leave the house.I also have a small Maxpedition pouch that I keep Rubber gloves & a few Bandaids that also goes with me. I have a pretty good First aid kit I put into a Molle Butt pack that stays in my care trunk. along with a Big Tupperware container that can go from car to car. juts in case of an extended Breakdown in the Hills or elsewhere. It even has extra food for the Dog. Its about time to re-organize all the stuff & thanks to this Article for reminding me to do so!!

Thompson
Thompson

I carry at least 4 Knives and 2 Gerbers on a daily basis, plus my riggers belt and combat boots.

I'm looking at getting a holster for my Surefire so I can carry that as well.

If I had to choose just 3 things they would be my Cold Steel Recon 1, Altama Ripple Tread combat boots and a Glock with extra mags.

I don't count my watch, riggers belt or paracord bracelet as I wear them everyday regardless. If something catastrophic happens like in your article the other day on the CERT course a cell phone/smartphone won't do you a shitbit of good when you have no signal or the network is overloaded, your better off with a compass and map or gps.

Thompson
Thompson

I carry at least 4 Knives and 2 Gerbers on a daily basis, plus my riggers belt and combat boots. I'm looking at getting a holster for my Surefire so I can carry that as well. If I had to choose just 3 things they would be my Cold Steel Recon 1, Altama Ripple Tread combat boots and a Glock with extra mags. I don't count my watch, riggers belt or paracord bracelet as I wear them everyday regardless. If something catastrophic happens like in your article the other day on the CERT course a cell phone/smartphone won't do you a shitbit of good when you have no signal or the network is overloaded, your better off with a compass and map or gps.

Juan
Juan

No 13 magazines of 556 or saw and like 400 rds of ap plus basic saw load?

Brian P
Brian P

I've been carrying some kind of EDC kit for years and they definitely need to change as your life and the season do. I carry a versipack and it holds most of what I need day-to-day. In my bag I have:

- Small roll of 100 mph tape

- Multi-tool and bits

- Folding knife

- Flashlight

- Extra mag

- MP3 player & ear buds

- USB cable

- Extra meds

- Very small but well stocked first-aid kit

- Aspirin

- Glasses case

- Poncho

- Hand warmers

- 2 AA and 2 CR123 batteries

- Extra lighter & fire starter

- Candy (I've got a blood sugar thing)

- Para cord bracelet

- Sharpie & pen & paper

- Emergency gas money

Brian P
Brian P

I've been carrying some kind of EDC kit for years and they definitely need to change as your life and the season do. I carry a versipack and it holds most of what I need day-to-day. In my bag I have: - Small roll of 100 mph tape - Multi-tool and bits - Folding knife - Flashlight - Extra mag - MP3 player & ear buds - USB cable - Extra meds - Very small but well stocked first-aid kit - Aspirin - Glasses case - Poncho - Hand warmers - 2 AA and 2 CR123 batteries - Extra lighter & fire starter - Candy (I've got a blood sugar thing) - Para cord bracelet - Sharpie & pen & paper - Emergency gas money

Eric
Eric

Good suggestions and questions. I would also include climate. Do you have harsh winters/summers for example.

ITS Admin
ITS Admin

Mike,

That's absolutely hilarious!! Perfect example of how to not EDC LOL! I'm sure he can move very easily if he had to hah!

Thanks for sharing,

Bryan

ITS Admin
ITS Admin

Mike, That's absolutely hilarious!! Perfect example of how to not EDC LOL! I'm sure he can move very easily if he had to hah! Thanks for sharing, Bryan

TJK
TJK

All this items fit in my pants pockets, in my jackets pocket and in my belt.

During the summer, I leave some of them in the car or at home.

TJK
TJK

All this items fit in my pants pockets, in my jackets pocket and in my belt. During the summer, I leave some of them in the car or at home.

rene
rene

Petzl!!! the Zipka headlamp is so much better than any other flashlight IMHP. it can go on the wrist or the head, and you dont have to waist a hand to use it. If I lose this one I get a new one the next day!

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