ITS ETA Kit Feedback

by December 4, 2009 12/4/09

ITS Blow Out Kit 07We’d like to get your feedback on what you think of our ITS Tactical ETA Kits.

We’ve sold quite a few and would truly value feedback from those of you who have bought them, or even those that haven’t. Positive or negative, we’d love to hear from you.

One of our readers, “Norbert,” just sent us over an email showing how he’s fit the contents into an ESSTAC Med Pouch he purchased from SKD Tactical. (Photos below)

We think the contents fit wonderfully and almost seem to be designed for that pouch!

Anyone else have a configuration they’re using other than keeping the contents in the Vacuum Sealed packaging?

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Benjamin Piper
Benjamin Piper

I purchased the ITS tactical blow out kit and think it's great. I only modified it in a couple of ways: I replaced the chest decompression needle with an ARS needle for chest decompression from North American Rescue. It's easer to open quickly, protects the needle from bending better than the one in the ITS blowout kit, and just looks to be a better quality product. It's in an easy to open sealed tube that looks like a permanent marker with a red cap. I also added a pair of 7 1/4 inch NAR trauma sheers for cutting clothing to gain better access to wounds, an SOF Tactical Tourniquet, and a black permanent marker for writing the time the tourniquet was applied either on the SOF Tactical Tourniquet, which has a place to write the time, or directly on the skin near the wound so that second-level care providers know when I put it on. I put all of these items into a small black Jansport fanny pack that I got at REI. I keep the kit in my range bag and at home. I'd like to put another one together for my car though. This is a link to the ARS chest decompression needle: http://www.narescue.com/ARS-for-Needle-Decompression-325-P18C205.aspx

mountainghost
mountainghost

I can only speak for my training and the use of it in real world situations from overseas to here. As for someone carrying anything from a BVM spo2 meter or hemostatic agent to a simple ABD pad. They should be proficiently trained in all the trauma gear they carry. I happen to have been a part of a team where the lowest person was an emergency medical responded I have been I circumstances when rescue has been up to 4 hrs to a day or more away, at elevations 10,000 and above. But by no means am I the end all be all. I was out classed many of times and I would not have it any other way ,by the great men and women of my team that’s the start of really learning .I just know what works and don’t for those particular situations.

As far as carrying gear that I am not trained to administer, I do carry Gear that I am not certified on for just that reason and I am glad to see someone think along those lines. you never know who will show up. I was only making an observation on the gloves being black because it does not let the color of the fluids of the body be identified. we all know what arterial jettison and blood looks like. But the black glove when doing a rapid patient assessment ,I cannot tell from my dealings with them what digestive enzymes mixed with blood or bile In the wound . The other glove colors helped me identify liquids that are being secreted out of the wound to relay to secondary care facility that could have infectious possibilities. this may or not be the case for everyone it works for me.

When it comes time to use whatever is in my arsenal, I just hope that my interventions will stabilize my patient till the next level of care. And I will always keep learning and striving to give the most expert and up to date care that I can. Well good luck SWATMEDIC and stay safe. Good corresponding.

mountainghost
mountainghost

I can only speak for my training and the use of it in real world situations from overseas to here. As for someone carrying anything from a BVM spo2 meter or hemostatic agent to a simple ABD pad. They should be proficiently trained in all the trauma gear they carry. I happen to have been a part of a team where the lowest person was an emergency medical responded I have been I circumstances when rescue has been up to 4 hrs to a day or more away, at elevations 10,000 and above. But by no means am I the end all be all. I was out classed many of times and I would not have it any other way ,by the great men and women of my team that’s the start of really learning .I just know what works and don’t for those particular situations. As far as carrying gear that I am not trained to administer, I do carry Gear that I am not certified on for just that reason and I am glad to see someone think along those lines. you never know who will show up. I was only making an observation on the gloves being black because it does not let the color of the fluids of the body be identified. we all know what arterial jettison and blood looks like. But the black glove when doing a rapid patient assessment ,I cannot tell from my dealings with them what digestive enzymes mixed with blood or bile In the wound . The other glove colors helped me identify liquids that are being secreted out of the wound to relay to secondary care facility that could have infectious possibilities. this may or not be the case for everyone it works for me. When it comes time to use whatever is in my arsenal, I just hope that my interventions will stabilize my patient till the next level of care. And I will always keep learning and striving to give the most expert and up to date care that I can. Well good luck SWATMEDIC and stay safe. Good corresponding.

PPGMD
PPGMD

SWATMedic,

Does your area have response times under say 3 minutes? Because depending on the severity of the bleed a person can be dead in under 3 minutes from a massive arterial hemorrhage.

Not all hemorrhages can be controlled with tourniquets, and the times when you would apply a hemostatic agent are times when pressure wouldn't be enough. And modern hemostatic agents don't do the damage that old Quikclot did.

Now I agree training is very important, but IMO you should include a little more in your kit then what you are trained to. Why? Often there are people more trained then you present.

Anyways that is my two cents, I'm not as well trained as you. But that is the opinion that was conveyed to me by the Docs that have taught my trauma training.

PPGMD
PPGMD

SWATMedic, Does your area have response times under say 3 minutes? Because depending on the severity of the bleed a person can be dead in under 3 minutes from a massive arterial hemorrhage. Not all hemorrhages can be controlled with tourniquets, and the times when you would apply a hemostatic agent are times when pressure wouldn't be enough. And modern hemostatic agents don't do the damage that old Quikclot did. Now I agree training is very important, but IMO you should include a little more in your kit then what you are trained to. Why? Often there are people more trained then you present. Anyways that is my two cents, I'm not as well trained as you. But that is the opinion that was conveyed to me by the Docs that have taught my trauma training.

SWATMedic
SWATMedic

I am not a big fan of hemostatic agents for the simple fact that MOST situations that are state side do not really warrant them given the relatively quick extraction and EVAC times. I think the poor education/training that most medical facilities have on them is IMHO a limiting factor on the cases where it would have worked well. I have seen a couple of docs that have been exposed or open to hemostatic agents, but most don't have a clue. Sometimes it is just not worth the fight. (I do think that hemostatic agents are a good thing and can save lives, but have their time and place. I like the Celox product and have used it in trials with success. I like the tube applicator.)

I have not had hands on with the HALO dressings, but they sound like the cats meow.

I concur on the black gloves. They are crap to begin with. I like gloves to be thick and could careless about the color. I do have a latex allergy so I am limited somewhat, but could careless when it hits the fan. (Is it just me or do the FD guys generally have the best BSI gloves. They seem paranoid!)

I think overall the kit is good, especially for the layman who may not have access to the medical supply chains that EMS/LEO have. Most of the products have decent instructions on the package, but I am all about prepping a head of time and training. There is nothing worse then trying to get something open only to find that it doesn't work with slippery gloves, etc. I tend to score/pre-cut packages so I can rip them open easily either one-handed or with my teeth.

I also make the guys on the team carry the same kit in the same location on their kit so I don't have to think where it is at or what is in it. I can go right to it and go to work. If I need more than I can go to the squad bag that I carry.

SWATMedic
SWATMedic

I am not a big fan of hemostatic agents for the simple fact that MOST situations that are state side do not really warrant them given the relatively quick extraction and EVAC times. I think the poor education/training that most medical facilities have on them is IMHO a limiting factor on the cases where it would have worked well. I have seen a couple of docs that have been exposed or open to hemostatic agents, but most don't have a clue. Sometimes it is just not worth the fight. (I do think that hemostatic agents are a good thing and can save lives, but have their time and place. I like the Celox product and have used it in trials with success. I like the tube applicator.) I have not had hands on with the HALO dressings, but they sound like the cats meow. I concur on the black gloves. They are crap to begin with. I like gloves to be thick and could careless about the color. I do have a latex allergy so I am limited somewhat, but could careless when it hits the fan. (Is it just me or do the FD guys generally have the best BSI gloves. They seem paranoid!) I think overall the kit is good, especially for the layman who may not have access to the medical supply chains that EMS/LEO have. Most of the products have decent instructions on the package, but I am all about prepping a head of time and training. There is nothing worse then trying to get something open only to find that it doesn't work with slippery gloves, etc. I tend to score/pre-cut packages so I can rip them open easily either one-handed or with my teeth. I also make the guys on the team carry the same kit in the same location on their kit so I don't have to think where it is at or what is in it. I can go right to it and go to work. If I need more than I can go to the squad bag that I carry.

mountainghost
mountainghost

Yes and no for a blow out kit, but one would hope that anyone who that carries this particular piece of equipment would be well educated in BLS. I could go in to that and write a small book on the subject. A responder IE medic that has worked in a pre hospital setting ,especially a setting where the means of extraction could be on a time table of question . knows the more information that is given to the receiving secondary can reduce the time spent on assessment ,and treatment can be given on a more adequate and rapid scale, document and remember.

And I know there will be someone out there is saying document and remember ,that’s good and fine when you’re not taking fires. My response is if your operators are doing their job than your fight is not with them your fight is with your patient. A good medic or responder can do a rapid assessment in 30 to 60 seconds and start interventions almost simultaneously in any condition and environments so understanding the fluids and smell can help the secondary understand the what may be going on. If the secondary does not use the information upon intake than no harm no foul.Always provide concise documentation. Some may or may not agree but this is what works for me.

mountainghost
mountainghost

Yes and no for a blow out kit, but one would hope that anyone who that carries this particular piece of equipment would be well educated in BLS. I could go in to that and write a small book on the subject. A responder IE medic that has worked in a pre hospital setting ,especially a setting where the means of extraction could be on a time table of question . knows the more information that is given to the receiving secondary can reduce the time spent on assessment ,and treatment can be given on a more adequate and rapid scale, document and remember. And I know there will be someone out there is saying document and remember ,that’s good and fine when you’re not taking fires. My response is if your operators are doing their job than your fight is not with them your fight is with your patient. A good medic or responder can do a rapid assessment in 30 to 60 seconds and start interventions almost simultaneously in any condition and environments so understanding the fluids and smell can help the secondary understand the what may be going on. If the secondary does not use the information upon intake than no harm no foul.Always provide concise documentation. Some may or may not agree but this is what works for me.

Norbert
Norbert

I think you're both right - your position wouldn't really be compromised any further by neon pink gloves. But wouldn't (please correct me if I'm wrong!) identifying hemorrhaging fluids at a scene go beyond the scope of what a BOK is for?

Thompson
Thompson

I agree with the guy above. You know when a medic or anybody else for that matter is giving aid. They are focused on an individual and they don't have there weapon out pulling security and/or shooting.

Because of my job I have a unique perspective on how the enemy thinks and how they operate. You know a medic and a clusterfuck when you see one so black or blue or neon green the gloves aren't going to give you away you've already done that by taking care of your battle buddy.

I would definitely buy one if I was a civilian being military I already have something similar.

Thompson
Thompson

I agree with the guy above. You know when a medic or anybody else for that matter is giving aid. They are focused on an individual and they don't have there weapon out pulling security and/or shooting. Because of my job I have a unique perspective on how the enemy thinks and how they operate. You know a medic and a clusterfuck when you see one so black or blue or neon green the gloves aren't going to give you away you've already done that by taking care of your battle buddy. I would definitely buy one if I was a civilian being military I already have something similar.

mountainghost
mountainghost

I have not bought the blow out kit yet, I do have plans to buy it though. It looks expertly put together I do have one recommendation ,ditch the black gloves and only for one reason, And some may argue this point but thru my experience this has been the case for me. The color of the glove does not ,allow the responder to accurately identify the color of the liquid that is being excreted from the patient during the rapid trauma assessment. I would either go with a purple glove or a green glove .

Now that I have said that, some of you are reading this and thinking that is just not tactical. Well if you think that your BSI protection is giving you a way while applying your interventions ,than you missed the point because if you are applying interventions in the first place you are no longer in the prime spot . I am only saying this from my stand point others might disagree and I respect that. I hope this has been of some help.

mountainghost
mountainghost

I have not bought the blow out kit yet, I do have plans to buy it though. It looks expertly put together I do have one recommendation ,ditch the black gloves and only for one reason, And some may argue this point but thru my experience this has been the case for me. The color of the glove does not ,allow the responder to accurately identify the color of the liquid that is being excreted from the patient during the rapid trauma assessment. I would either go with a purple glove or a green glove . Now that I have said that, some of you are reading this and thinking that is just not tactical. Well if you think that your BSI protection is giving you a way while applying your interventions ,than you missed the point because if you are applying interventions in the first place you are no longer in the prime spot . I am only saying this from my stand point others might disagree and I respect that. I hope this has been of some help.

SWATMedic
SWATMedic

@PPGMD

"Does your area have response times under say 3 minutes? Because depending on the severity of the bleed a person can be dead in under 3 minutes from a massive arterial hemorrhage."

-If its a preplan then yes, we have a truck if not two standing by. Is everything a preplan, NO. Is it a load and go in three minutes, not likely. Does everything go as planned, not always. Situation will always dictate, however, I do agree with your statement, people can bleed out very quickly, and prudence must be shown. But at the same time we must consider all factors in our decision to use any treatment. Would I use a hemostatic agent to save a life, without hesitation, but it must be the right treatment for the right reason.

"Not all hemorrhages can be controlled with tourniquets, and the times when you would apply a hemostatic agent are times when pressure wouldn’t be enough. And modern hemostatic agents don’t do the damage that old Quikclot did."

-I agree and I concur that Quckclot and other manufactures have made tremendous improvements in reducing complications that were seen early on. I would think that helps bolster the products acceptance, but I am just not seeing wide acceptance in my area.

"Now I agree training is very important, but IMO you should include a little more in your kit then what you are trained to. Why? Often there are people more trained then you present."

-I agree and and in no way did I suggest that it be removed, please see my comments at the end of the first paragraph. My impression and view of the BOK is that it is a stop gap until next level of care can be reached.

I am not a Doc, and don't play one on TV, but when I am surrounded by people who do know more then I most certainly take the opportunity to learn from them and their experiences. I realized a long time ago that I do not know it all, and consider myself a life long learner. There is always a take away. I have gleaned some amazing skills/insights from people that I have encountered in serving that you would never find in a book, and for those experiences are am grateful.

"Anyways that is my two cents, I’m not as well trained as you. But that is the opinion that was conveyed to me by the Docs that have taught my trauma training."

-I appreciate your thoughts. I am glad to see that you have some progressive docs and facilities that you work with and for that I am envious. Old habits die hard for some, which is the irony of this discussion. On one hand, medicine seems to be progressive and desiring better patient outcomes through better science, products, technology, yet in the same breath they are some times the slowest adopters. Seems like there will always be variations on what should be done, when, where, by whom.

SWATMedic
SWATMedic

@PPGMD "Does your area have response times under say 3 minutes? Because depending on the severity of the bleed a person can be dead in under 3 minutes from a massive arterial hemorrhage." -If its a preplan then yes, we have a truck if not two standing by. Is everything a preplan, NO. Is it a load and go in three minutes, not likely. Does everything go as planned, not always. Situation will always dictate, however, I do agree with your statement, people can bleed out very quickly, and prudence must be shown. But at the same time we must consider all factors in our decision to use any treatment. Would I use a hemostatic agent to save a life, without hesitation, but it must be the right treatment for the right reason. "Not all hemorrhages can be controlled with tourniquets, and the times when you would apply a hemostatic agent are times when pressure wouldn’t be enough. And modern hemostatic agents don’t do the damage that old Quikclot did." -I agree and I concur that Quckclot and other manufactures have made tremendous improvements in reducing complications that were seen early on. I would think that helps bolster the products acceptance, but I am just not seeing wide acceptance in my area. "Now I agree training is very important, but IMO you should include a little more in your kit then what you are trained to. Why? Often there are people more trained then you present." -I agree and and in no way did I suggest that it be removed, please see my comments at the end of the first paragraph. My impression and view of the BOK is that it is a stop gap until next level of care can be reached. I am not a Doc, and don't play one on TV, but when I am surrounded by people who do know more then I most certainly take the opportunity to learn from them and their experiences. I realized a long time ago that I do not know it all, and consider myself a life long learner. There is always a take away. I have gleaned some amazing skills/insights from people that I have encountered in serving that you would never find in a book, and for those experiences are am grateful. "Anyways that is my two cents, I’m not as well trained as you. But that is the opinion that was conveyed to me by the Docs that have taught my trauma training." -I appreciate your thoughts. I am glad to see that you have some progressive docs and facilities that you work with and for that I am envious. Old habits die hard for some, which is the irony of this discussion. On one hand, medicine seems to be progressive and desiring better patient outcomes through better science, products, technology, yet in the same breath they are some times the slowest adopters. Seems like there will always be variations on what should be done, when, where, by whom.

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