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A lot of EDC Knife questions


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#21 C4 U no more

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 08:00 PM

since i bought my TAD ranger ive filled the pockets with knives my knife EDC consists of a cold steel spartan,a tan handle black bladed sheeps foot griptilian from benchmade,a tanto minimalist from CRKT,and a benchmade 530 :evil:
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#22 Lao

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 08:31 AM

since i bought my TAD ranger ive filled the pockets with knives my knife EDC consists of a cold steel spartan,a tan handle black bladed sheeps foot griptilian from benchmade,a tanto minimalist from CRKT,and a benchmade 530 :evil:


Nice blades.... but remember, don't bring a knife to a gunfight :) LOL
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#23 PapaCannoli

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 02:35 PM

It all depends on what you want. I would almost never trust my life to a folder. And the onse that I would are fair over $200. If you dont carry a back up fixed blade than an "expensive" folder is probably the way to go.

For a small fixed blad you can't go wrong with Kabar, esee or blind horse knives(BHK). All are made in the USA and can be found for under $100.

I carry two blades a Gerber Hinder(folder) and either an Esee Candirue (neck) or BHK White Tiger (necker). My gerber was around $50 and I use it every day. It's something that I will not cry about getting messed up. I just got the BHK and have not tested it's limits yet. Esee can almost not be beat for its reliability.

There is nothing wrong with having a backup.

#24 TearsOfNorris

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 09:35 AM

If you live in a state with concealed carry, I would highly recommend picking your EDC knife for utility only. It should be considered an absolute last resort weapon. If you have to escalate to lethal force, you'd rather have the standoff capability of a pocket heater. Knives can be just as lethal, but are a lot more intimate, and I for one prefer not to get too cozy with criminals.
That being said, the best utility blades are sturdy, sharp, reliable, low-maintenance, and don't unexpectedly close on your fingers. These are also admirable traits in an effective combat folder, but if you have your CCL, don't be afraid to go with a Leatherman instead of an Applegate-Fairbairn.

#25 SilentP

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 03:40 AM

I carry a CRKT M16-14SF Tanto, and it's been my carry knife at work and at home for the past 7 years. I have used it to pry open a trunk, cut a slug out of the bumper of a lexus, cut open cans of tuna and beans, and do other more "normal" knife things. I also tend to conveniently loose expensive things, so this is a great bang for your buck knife.

The newer M16-14LEK has a little more doo-dads to it, and looks as though the "hilt" will do less damage to jeans the my SF. It is slightly large for a folder, but I don't find it cumbersome whether I carry in my front or back jeans pocket. I also am a big fan of how easy it is to change the clip for whatever carry side you prefer. The only downside is that the frame could have some grooves to prevent slippage.

LongHaul suggested the Doug Ritter RSK MK1 which is another great knife. My only personal preference "issue" is that I'm not a fan of how wide it feels in my pocket, due to the frame being bowed out.

After using a tanto blade for this amount of time, I may go with a plain blade for my next knife. It makes it slightly more difficult for normal slicing tasks, as you are just using the flat tip sections of the blade, or the point between both angled blades. I currently carry a ESEE Izula along side the CRKT and find a blade with a deep belly much more useful for slicing.

#26 LongHaul

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 12:12 PM

SilentP,

That's a good point about the frame on the RSK MK1. It is a little bit wider which makes it feel a bit different in your pocket. For me the bowed out frame feels more comfortable to use because of the way it fills your hand and because the edges are all rounded. I could definately see not liking the wider frame in a pocket, but for me it's a tradeoff I'm willing to make. The new CRKT M16-14LEK that you linked looks like a great knife. I've considered getting the M16 in the past but wondered how the hilt would feel to carry. It looks like the single sided hilt might solve any issues.

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#27 Lao

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 02:43 PM

This is a nice little blade, K.I.S.S in the Dark ... One of the reviewers stated he uses it as a money clip, it's definitely low key enough for that and very inconspicuous.

Edited by Lao, 18 December 2012 - 02:44 PM.

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#28 SilentP

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 03:34 AM

SilentP,

That's a good point about the frame on the RSK MK1. It is a little bit wider which makes it feel a bit different in your pocket. For me the bowed out frame feels more comfortable to use because of the way it fills your hand and because the edges are all rounded. I could definately see not liking the wider frame in a pocket, but for me it's a tradeoff I'm willing to make. The new CRKT M16-14LEK that you linked looks like a great knife. I've considered getting the M16 in the past but wondered how the hilt would feel to carry. It looks like the single sided hilt might solve any issues.


I definitely like the grippy-ness of the MK1 (or any of benchmade griptilians), than the flat, non-textured CRKT. But since I have fat quads I have to opt for something less bulbous. Any "flatter" knife just works better for me.

#29 slicksierra

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 12:55 PM

Not sure if its a dirty word around here but I've been carrying a SOG Magnadot for a little over a month. Its a very hefty folder that takes a good flick of the wrist to assist in the opening but is very solid. The handle is longer then the blade which feels nice in your hand. The partial serrations are nice but the stainless finish is extremely reflective. For the price point ($20) and the free sharpener included it was a great buy. Definitely a contender with similar Gerber, Kershaw etc. The only gripe I have with it is the fact of not being made in the United States

#30 schorched

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Posted 24 December 2012 - 02:08 PM

I recently bought the CRKT M16-14SFGL and for a knife in the 50 dollar range it looks, feels and performs anything but cheaply. Although it's not my most expensive folder, it has become my favorite. It arrived with a hell of an edge on it and is solid with good weight to it. Feels nice and substantial in the hand. It's right on the edge of being a bit big for a pocket knife but has worked out so far just fine and I'm a pretty short guy so probably not an issue for a normal sized dude haha. any bigger would be maybe to much for an EDC, but this is a perfect size at least to my taste to have a balance of carryability and enough knife to actually do some work with and if need be protect yourself. I believe I paid around 40 bucks for it at bladehq.com .

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#31 Probablytaken

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Posted 29 December 2012 - 12:00 AM

I also picked up a knife or two from Woot.com. It's worth keeping an eye on that site as they frequently put up some very nice deals on EDC style blades and multitools. I have recently gotten both a Leatherman Freestyle CX and a Kershaw Vapor III that are my two primary EDC, but I have also gotten a couple others from there as well.
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#32 C4 U no more

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 09:45 AM

Nice blades.... but remember, don't bring a knife to a gunfight :) LOL

well being 19 i cant carry yet soo next best thing is physical abbility complemented with a lot of sharp things :ph34r:

Edited by C4 U no more, 26 February 2013 - 01:20 PM.

heart is cold, and my weapons are washed in blood, i avow to the call on high, my resolve in the blessed above,in this ever-consuming divide “ demon hunter"

#33 Armitage12

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 07:11 PM

I carry a Kershaw Blackout 1550st (partly serrated, assisted opening). It has served me well for the past six months. I carry it IWB where I work, under a suit jacket, and it sits without problem over the kidney. When I went looking, I kept price, blade length, and handed-ness in mind as my variables for this purchase. If you're left handed you have to keep in mind where the stud is (this one is reversible). I'll be getting the Random Task next as the other Kershaw speed assist for lefties. If I upgrade above that, I'll keep the length and handedness features while changing price. For more rugged work (hiking camping etc non-EDC) I'll get something else. I would not recommend this for self-defense, both because it is a non-fixed blade and the clip might interfere with the grip if one were indeed using it that way. Nonetheless, I realize that I have something that would intimidate some, and mess up someone's day in a close quarters collision (I have zero illusions that I know how to handle CQC). Being as I am on a campus, I deal with it being a gun free zone (snort snort) so this is the best that I could do without really freaking people out. Still, an EDC sword with the suit would be pretty cool....

#34 tatedunham

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 02:52 PM

I usually have a CRTK in my pocket. They are fairly inexpensive, the blade keeps its sharpness alright. The fasteners have come out so I Loctite them and no problems. But the one thing that I liked a lot about CRTK is they warranty a fair amount of parts and ship them out at no charge.
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#35 eagledesigncorp

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 11:50 PM

usa benchmade for me. ive been carrying them for a long time now and for the quality and made in the USofA i will pay extra. currently a rukus auto goes everywhere with me along with a leatherman and a custom made gentleman style folder a good friend from the USMC made for me. I did however just pick up a ESEE Izula neck knife that i am trying out be the whole neck knife thing is new to me so i guess time will tell if it is a good fit
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#36 BLACK

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 12:07 PM

I have a small EDC knife that I keep on me for small tasks but I wouldn't want my life to depend on it.So with that I am shopping for a new EDC knife. Budget isn't really an issue but I don't want to spend $200.00 on an EDC knife when a $50.00 knife will work just as well.CRKT looks like they make decent knives that are pretty cheap but typically cheap = poor quality. Can someone give me some feedback on their personal experiences?Benchmade is a little pricier than CRKT but doesn't look any better built, any feedback on Benchmade?ZT again is more expensive but if they are better knives it would be worth the money.With blades, I prefer the look of the Tanto style blades, any reason not to go with a Tanto style?Will I see a big difference in how long a knife stays sharp when comparing Blade "A" to Blade "B"?What size blade would you recommend?If you could carry any knife which one would it be?I would like to go with American Made but I am willing to check out others if they blow me away.



I have gone down this road many times and there are several "reputable" companies out there who sell knifes for 200.00 that are utter shyte. Stay away from chinese made fixed blades...Japanese fixed flades may be slightly better but I have broken tips off of expensive blades in something as soft as a wooden cutting board or a pig bone.
I turned my attention to the American small business owner and I am happy I did. I finally rested with a Mark Terrell USK and had Off the Grid Concepts fabricate a kydex sheath for it. http://www.mtknives.com/usk.html
It cost me a pretty penny but I feel like if I can spend 500.00 bucks on a gun that wont see near as much use as an EDC knife, then I can spend that kind of money on something that will be used on a consistent basis, every EFFIN day. I am not saying to go and spend that kind of wad on a custom knife but this knife will last generations whereas other knives that cost almost the same will break or fail within the next few years.
I have also found less expensive alternatives that are American made and probably just as tough.
Scrapyard Kife works may fit right up your alley if you are looking for something that wont hurt the bank account yet provide durability and longevity.
http://www.scrapyard....com/knives.htm



SALUS
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#37 BLACK

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 12:40 PM

I failed to mention that I carry 2 folders to augment my fixed blade. I see a lot of references to CRKT so...
I normally buy the CRKT knives from BIG5 becuase I can get a good 70.00 knife for 10.00 to 20.00 on sale and they are always on sale. I also have knives from HK, SIG,S&W and Kershaw. I have seen several Kershaw folders that are US made as all the others I mentioned aside from the SIG(Seki Japan) are Chinese, The one fault I have found is the screws for the pocket clip and sometimes the grip slabs tend to back out. Nothing that siome blue loctite wont solve. I have found that the thumb assist tends to back out on some of the S&W border guard series of knives but the poket clip and grip slap screws stay in tact without loctite.
It can be hit or miss and this is why I frequesnt BIG5 becuase I dont want to pay 70.00 for a folder that sheds its parts within the first few weeks or at all for that matter. 10 to 20 bux tho leaves room for T&E so I have carried and used a lot of different folders.

#38 NateX

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 08:11 PM

Kershaw Leek most days, but if I need something heavier it is the Blur. Love the Ken Onion knives, and they are affordable and solid as hell. The Leek is strictly a utility knife, but it's razor sharp and holds a great edge, more of a tool than a weapon. The Blur has some heft and could serve as a backup weapon, though, I don't relish the idea of knife fighting. Too close for me. Knives for me are tools primarily. If I am knife fighting, it means I am out of ammunition and can't run.
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#39 micah larson

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 10:57 AM

At first glance, a higher end knife such as a benchmade or spyderco may seem like a waste of money compared to a cheaper knife, but when you consider the usefulness of the knife over its life as well as ability to cut well and safely over the life of the tool and the fact that its something that you will use daily, I feel that spending a little more is justified. I wouldn't blink an eye at spending $500 or more on a handgun which I may never actually use in anger, why would I think any less of spending $200 or more on a EDC knife that I will probably use every day and may also be used as a life saving tool in a pinch? Cheaper knives may look "cool" and have some of the same features, but the reason they cost less is corners are cut in the construction and materials used. Edge geometry is probably not optimized for cutting and the blade steel is probably cheaper and softer. Parts such as pivots have lower quality parts such as washers which wear out and make your blade loose, or difficult to open smoothly. Locks are not as strong or durable as on a quality knife and may wear out early, or worse yet, close on your fingers and injure you. In all actuality, barring the loss of the knife, spending more initially on a good quality knife (or really anything usually) usually equates to less money spent in the long run because the tool is likely to last much longer and be easier to use than a cheaper version would be.


I really like the Benchmade griptilian line as far as a good value for money goes. I personally have never been disappointed with a benchmade that I have owned. They are available for around $100.

I currently carry a DPX Hest folder and have been pretty pleased with it. It has some kinda gimmicky features such as a bottle opener and wire strippers, but I actually find those two items fairly useful. Being a police officer I have also used the glass breaker on the knife and can say that it did what it says it does much better than a baton or flashlight. I like the fact that its easy to clean with the open design of the handle and holds an edge extremely well. It seems to be nearly indestructible and Ive used it for everything from opening my mail to skinning animals. It was my only knife while I was at some recent training in texas and I used it to prepare numerous meals with ease. Ive used it for light prying (knives aren't prybars I know) and even used it to make kindling by batoning it through some sticks (which also isn't recommended) with no problems. I have also heard that the company has great customer service and a "no questions asked warrantee". If I could only have one knife, I think this would be it. They are available for around $175.

I have little to no experience with Spyderco, but have heard good things. They are mostly made in asia though.

I also have a ZT 0651 in my mail box currently, so I can't comment on it, but may be another brand to look at.

I have owned a strider SMF in the past, it was a great knife if you need a knife to be a pry bar and not actually cut anything. I got it for free from the military (lucky me) and when I got home I sold it and bought a gun with the money. Strider seems to be a great knife if you cut things like oil drums and rebar for a living, but for the rest of humanity are probably not needed.

It seems that the ultimate pocket knife for many is the Chris Reeve sebenza. It has a great simple design (as you know, the more complex something is, the more things there are to fail), great edge geometry for slicing and it possesses a near legendary reputation. I've never owned one due to the cost, but wish I did.

In general things to look for on a EDC knife are quality materials, a company who stand behind their product, useful blade shape, edge geometry and lock design/strength.

Most of the higher end knife brands will cover the first two requirements easily. As far as useful blade shape, a knife is a cutting tool and should be able to cut easily. This means a thin cutting edge, not a super thick prybar edge. Most knives sold today have what is called a compound bevel as shown in the middle of the following photo: Posted Image
In a compound bevel, the smaller bevel toward the bottom of the photo is called the secondary bevel. The larger bevel is the primary bevel. When selecting a good cutting blade, select a blade that has a larger or "higher" Primary bevel. This will enable the secondary bevel to be thinner and therefore slice better when you cut. Selecting a knife with proper edge geometry is pretty easy once you understand that thinner edge bevel means it will slice better. Lock strength is the last consideration, but its pretty important. Most of the brands that cover the first two requirements also have well designed and strong locks.

In summary, you get what you pay for in a knife when you buy from a reputable company.

#40 ahaley222

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 06:35 PM

I've been carrying my Chris Reeve Sebenza every day for at least three years. I own many knives from Spyderco, Benchmade, and CRKT and Nothing feels as solid as the Reeve. Also the simplicity of it is very classy.




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