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Medical Training AARs or Reviews

Patriot Nurse Medical Training Medical Prep

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#1 LongHaul

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Posted 06 April 2013 - 09:11 PM

(wasn't sure if this should go in Medical or Training, I settled on training...)

Has anyone attended any of The Patriot Nurse's medical training? I first saw her in a Tactical Response video. Here is a link to her website. I've watched a few of her videos on youtube and I'm considering attending one of her courses. Anyone have an AAR? Thanks!

http://thepatriotnurse.com
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#2 Davis

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 10:23 PM

This is the first I have ever heard of this outfit. Looks like some good information. I will be curious to see if anybody on here is more familiar.

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#3 LongHaul

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 11:34 PM

Yeah, I'm hoping someone has an AAR they can post about the patriot nurse's training. My thought with naming this thread "Medical Training AARs or Reviews was to start a consolidated thread for all medical training after action reports. So, if anyone has recommendations or any info on training you've attended, I'm sure a lot of us would like to see the info.

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#4 Psybain

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 10:23 AM

I'll post my review of the T2 Training TCCC course I did in early march up here shortly. I've been meaning to, but I've been busy trying to get things ready for my overseas PCS which may not happen anymore.

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#5 Psybain

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 11:09 AM

T2 Training TCCC Two Day Immersive Training – March 1-2, 2013


I first heard of T2 Training from a post by Tactical Distributors on my facebook account in late January. I have wanted to take a TCCC course for a while since my last real medical training was nearly a decade ago when I was in boot camp and a number of things have changed since then. One of the things I liked about T2 was that their CEO, Fred Kolberg, is a retired SEAL Corpsman so I knew he had a good amount of real world experience and examples to help drive things home and to answer any questions we may have. Also, as an active duty Marine, I’ve found it’s easier to talk with navy guys in general because we use some of the same lingo.

I emailed T2’s CEO and asked him when the next TCCC class coming up, since I couldn’t make the early February one. He promptly replied with the dates for the March course and told me I only needed to bring a pair of shorts for the practical application exam, and that all medical supplies would be provided by them. About a week prior to the course I was emailed by his wife Julie, who is also the President of T2, and given the address for where the course would be held on Dam Neck and reminded to bring a pair of shorts for the prac app portion.

I was the first to arrive at the building on the morning of the first, and was greeted by Fred as he was bringing some materials inside. He was very friendly and let me know that a couple other students had cancelled so it might be a small class. After a few minutes two more students arrived, both of whom were DoE SRT guys from Washington (and former Marines), and we kicked things off with a pre-test to see what our knowledge was coming into the course. The minimum passing score was 70% and I limped in with a 68%, but Fred’s positive attitude had me confident in my ability to pass the written test at the end of the class. After the pre-test, we began with a brief history on the TCCC concept, and the differences in care between the Hot Zone, Warm Zone, and Cold Zone. We were also informed that good tactics makes for good medicine, meaning not to begin working on the patient until after the threat had been eliminated. He also stressed the acronym of SCABC to help us remember the priority of care:
  • Situational Awareness/Self Aid
  • Circulatory – major bleeding from the extremities
  • Airway
  • Breathing
  • Circulatory – torso and minor wounds

We were also reminded that by communicating with the casualty while engaging the threat will allow you to determine if he has an obstructed airway, level of consciousness, and how his breathing is, in addition to finding out where he’s been hit.

Once we started getting into the actual hand on training, I was frequently used by Fred to demonstrate the techniques to the other two members of the class, since I was the least experienced of the three of us, this also gave me a better understanding of what I needed to do when it was my turn to practice it. We were all provided with T2 Training’s trauma kits for use during the course, which are fairly similar to the ITS Tactical ETA kits, but they include a CAT tourniquet because it can be applied one handed if need be. In his opinion, he prefers the CAT over the SOFTT because of this.

He also instructed us on how to properly do a physical sweep the body for blood/holes that is just as effective at night by using the fingertips to take the body from the clavicle to the navel across the entire torso in order to make sure that nothing is missed if the casualty is covered in blood or in low light, this prevents overlooking anything during a visual inspection.

After our chow break, we proceeded to cover protecting the airway, including the use of the nasopharyngeal airway (NPA). I was a little apprehensive about doing this since it was my first time and I didn’t want to do it wrong, but it’s actually pretty easy to do as long as you apply firm pressure to the NPA while pushing it through the opening in the sinus cavity. If you’ve never had one used on you, all I can say is that it’s a really weird feeling. It doesn’t hurt or pinch or anything, it’s just odd. We also covered how to properly cut the trachea in the event the casualty was unable to support a NPA. After this, we covered how, when, and where to properly apply needle decompression.

We finished up the first day by covering the correct application of combat gauze, treating abdominal wounds and abdominal trauma, head and spine trauma, burns and the signs and treatment of shock. By the end of day, we were about 95% complete with the class since there were only three of us. I felt confident that I would pass the written test in the morning, but I made sure I studied all the new information I had learned.

The next morning, we covered treatment of eye injuries, and then took the final written text. I’m proud to say I scored a 96% on the test, and no one scored under 90% overall. Fred said that he wants us to make sure we got our money’s worth out of the class, so he brought in saline lock kits for each of us that morning so we could get some additional training with our extra time. I was thrilled that he wanted to make sure we got as much training as he could fit into the schedule, but I have never been a fan of needles, or IVs for that matter… too many bad experiences with boot navy corpsmen turning me into their own personal pin cushion with varying degrees of success. Both of the DoE students had very limited experience applying saline locks, and I had none, but we all did a pretty good job, and we all got it done successfully on the first try.

From there, we moved on to practical application in the classroom, where we would take turns being a victim while one of the students would walk in blind and have to identify and treat the victim’s wounds. Even being just in the classroom, this caused me to do an adrenaline dump from being put in a blind scenario on the spot. After taking a few moments to take a breath and to force myself to relax and focus, I began to treat the victim’s initial symptoms of being unconscious and unresponsive, before he “woke up” and began to thrash violently around me. Let me tell you, it’s no fun trying to restrain a man that’s got 6” and probably about 90 lbs on you while trying to treat his wounds. At the end of each scenario, we would critique each other on the good things we saw, and what could be improved on. Once we all completed our blind scenarios in the classroom, we were released for chow and told to return wearing shorts for the field scenarios.

The area that we did the field training at Dam Neck is apparently mostly used by the VA NG, and consisted of a ton of shipping containers stacked on top of each other. Frank set up a gunfire simulator connected to a propane tank for added realism, and the plan was we would enter in two man teams to repel the enemy and treat the casualty until medevac was en route. The victim was hidden from the response team as fake wounds and blood were applied to his body, and cuts were made on the painter's suit he was wearing. Once he was in position, the gunfire would start to let us know it was time to save him. All in all, we did pretty well, even though when it was my turn to be the victim, I was told that I was going to eventually die since they had more advanced training. It was definitely interesting to hear them work through everything to try to revive me as I was fading out- their level of determination to try to bring me back let me know that their team members would be safe if they were ever injured in the line of duty.

I have no real negatives about the course. The only problem I had was finding my way to the classroom on the first day because my phone’s GPS kept trying to take me to side gates that were closed off. It would have been helpful to get directions to the front gate since I was unfamiliar with the area. Other than that, the class was great.

If anyone in the NC/VA area is looking to become TCCC certified, I would definitely recommend T2. Frank is knowledgeable and passionate about training people to save lives, and it shows. In the middle of the lessons he would have appropriate videos pertaining to the lesson we were covering, and he would have us point out what the responders were doing correctly, and incorrectly based off what we had learned. It really drove home how just a little bit of knowledge can have a big difference on someone’s life, or even keeping them calm and comfortable until they are able to be evac’d from the scene. T2 also sends trainers down to various departments/units on request, and will tailor their courses to the user’s needs. His wife is a certified moulage specialist, and applies realistic wounds to the victims for unit training events. I am trying to work with my G-3 training section on getting them to coordinate with T2 for pre-deployment medical training for the CLS-certified Marines, but sequestration unfortunately hit just a couple weeks after my class, so that may be something that gets put on the backburner due to budget cuts.

If anyone is interested in attending their open enrolment TCCC course, details can be found at the link below:

http://t2training.com/tccc-course/
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#6 LongHaul

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 07:19 PM

Thanks for the awesome AAR Psybain! Sounds like a great course. Hopefully you can get your guys into the training.

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#7 Psybain

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 07:23 PM

It really was. I brought a camera to take pics, but I wanted to focus on the training since it came out of my paycheck, and there were so.few students I didn't have time to dick around much while the other guys were practicing. Maybe someone else will take the course and snag some pics.

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#8 Psybain

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 06:53 AM

In light of the recent events in Boston, I just want to stress the importance of having some good medical training. Even if you dont have a good trauma kit like the ETA kit, or the one offered by T2, you can use your knowledge and training to essist the overwhelmed EMTs on the scene.

Here is just one example from yesterday of one of the participants using his training to help the first responders:

Roupen Bastajian, a state trooper from Smithfield, R.I., had just finished the race when he heard the explosions.

"I started running toward the blast. And there were people all over the floor," he said. "We started grabbing tourniquets and started tying legs. A lot of people amputated. ... At least 25 to 30 people have at least one leg missing, or an ankle missing, or two legs missing."


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#9 mangeface

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Posted 09 May 2013 - 09:31 PM

Class on November 16th in Oklahoma City. Shame I'll be in Austin, TX for the Fomula 1 USGP race as I'd like to attend a class like this.

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#10 Randy Long

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 12:32 PM

Dark Angel Medical Tactical Aid Course North Lima, OH March 22-23 2014

Instructor: Jackson

 

Day 1

Topics: Brief History of Field Medicine, Ethics and Legality, Warrior Mindset, Combat Psychology and Physiology, Scene Safety, Situational Awareness, Basic Anatomy and Physiology, Assessment and Priority of Injuries, Treatment for Hemorrhaging, Airway, Breathing Injuries, Assessment for Neurological status, Basic First Aid Identification and Treatment of Injuries, Immediate Care Injuries.

My Take Day 1

Day 1 was rough, it’s almost all classroom lecture with breaks almost every hour. Most of the topics have relevant videos associated with them. It was apply put “It’s like taking a fire hose to the face with information.”  It is all well organized and put together so everything flows really well.  There are a lot of medical terms used during the course and Jackson did a great job translating and simplifying them to explain them to the class. Acronyms like call A-CAB-N-Go, or the Assessment being broken down to HABCDE make it a lot easier to remember and follow. There are two sections devoted to what I would call Basic First Aid because it is subjects covered in a Red Cross or American Heart Association First Aid Class. This need to know information since it’s more common than the Immediate Care Injuries and the participants may not have this training prior to going to the Tactical Aid Class.

 

Day 2

Topics: Finishing up with Immediate Care Injuries, IDMK concept, Equipment Familiarization and Practice, Victim Movement, Other Considerations, Triage, Scenario Training.  

 

My Take Day 2

Day 2 would be the fun day. It started out with classroom lecture then moved to practical skills. It was nice to be able to handle several different pieces of equipment since Dark Angel produces several different products and the class got to work with each piece and see their pros and cons. It was nice being able to handle a C-A-T tq, next to a SOFT-W tq, to the SWAT tq. Then working with Israeli Compression Bandage, H Compression Bandage, Wound stuffing, use of SAM splints, chest seals but to manikin to practice on. Since this was a Civilian class we only got to see chest decompression needles and a general explanation of use. The scenario training was not planned and quickly organized but very useful to see the limitations of D.A.R.K gen 3.

 

What you get from the course

D.A.R.K Kit gen 3, A Dark Angel Challenge Coin, Certificate of Completion, Dark Angel Moral Patch, Dark Angel Sticker, and a Dark Angel Tactical Aid Course Handbook which contains all the Power Point Slides

 

My take on the whole course

It is an excellent course. I highly recommend this course for shooters, and hunters, cops or anyone else who tends to do dangerous or risking activities. It is not a Tactical Combat Casualty Care Course. It has a lot of the same information. As the class had two minors one was in the class the youngest was 14 and it did not overwhelm them. It shows the simplicity and excellence in teaching this complex material.

 

Where to go next: TCCC course, RC or AHA First Aid and CPR course, RC Wilderness First Aid, EMT-B



#11 Jersey0311

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 07:48 PM

Everyone should be CPR certified, period. First aid doesn't hurt either, if nothing else it's a resume builder. Wilderness FA is a good idea. As I've stated previously, the "official" TCCC course varies way too much depending on the instructor and facilities available. TC3 spinoff classes like Dark Angel, LSM, etc, are way better bang for your buck, and you actually learn something.

 

This is coming from someone that teaches the "official" TCCC course and has taken TCCC type training from other vendors. YMMV.

 

EMT is a little much only because it's a very perishable skill. If you don't plan on working part time or volunteering as an EMT, 90% of what you learn you'll forget.


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