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"TacMed 101" - Patrol level Tactical Medical training course.


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#1 DirtyTrigger

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Posted 23 October 2013 - 10:44 AM

Good day all.

Several weeks ago CENTCOM introduced my class I am teaching and small company Granite Firearms Training that I run. I was holding a class on 10/19 but as luck would have it, I had a last minute training conflict with my own department that a function a Reserve LEO for. Had to postpone. I know a couple had expressed interest so I thought I'd throw it out there again.

I am now "re-introducing" the class for 11/9. Here is from my Facebook Page.


As most you know, the original date got bumped to a last minute, mandatory scheduling conflict with myself and training at my own department. All those signed up, we have talked and see you guys soon. This is to re-announce the class as I have some slots open and I also have a few extra Medical kits left if you would like a kit but can not make the class (Kits with pouch are 45). Class will be held down in Casa Grande. 9 AM-5PM. The Class is 140.00 and that covers all range costs, targets class fee, and receive your med kit which includes a pouch, brand new CAT-T, 4 " compression bandage, gloves, and Z-Pack gauze.

There will be roughly 2 hours of Medical instruction along with plenty of practical, hands on exercise. Then, 6 hours of solid range time. We will be working with Handguns and Rifles, (Student choice) and working with 2-Man Tactics, covering several different scenarios, tactics, and movements. All team work will be focused on 2 Man Drills to keep the focus on real world, limited options to a critical event. Ammo count should be around 300-400 rounds. Any questions contact here or email me at [email protected]


I have about 3-4 slots open as the class has a 10 Person cap. It promises to be a fun, solid day of training a lot of hands on, functional and practical experience. I think I have most of the info stated above but if you have any questions or comments, please feel free to reach out here, or email me. Thanks everyone for your patience.
.

Stay safe

John

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#2 Psybain

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Posted 23 October 2013 - 12:22 PM

Think you might be doing it again later? I cant make it to the one in Nov, but I'd be interested if there is another one sometime in the future as long as my schedule allows it. Thanks.

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#3 PsychoFish

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 02:31 PM

Any other ITS Pimps gonna be hitting this class up? I'm signed up for this Saturday, and as I understand there are still spots open! Get in there and learn some new skills!
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#4 Davis

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 07:43 PM

Sadly I have to back out of the class. I was in for the original date but unfortunately my work just caused an unavoidable conflict for me this weekend. I do however fully intend on taking other training with Granite Firearms.

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#5 Psybain

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 08:44 PM

I hope to be attending a future tac med class with them in the future. $140 is a great price for some combined weapons and medical training.
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#6 DirtyTrigger

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 09:55 PM

Yes, I will be doing this class again, probably after the 1st of year. All though, this particular one is a bit of a strain due to the resources pulled for it, but I am stoked, should be a lot of fun, great opportunity to learn and sharpen skills. I will get some photos :cool: up, even though it might be a small class.

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#7 Psybain

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 10:28 PM

Personally, I prefer small classes, gives you lots of one on one with the instructor and you get to learn extra stuff usually.I was one of 3 students in the tccc class I attended, and we were able to cover iv locks with the extra time we had.

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#8 DirtyTrigger

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 10:32 PM

Personally, I prefer small classes, gives you lots of one on one with the instructor and you get to learn extra stuff usually.I was one of 3 students in the tccc class I attended, and we were able to cover iv locks with the extra time we had.


I am with you, I prefer being in, and more importantly, teaching small classes. I like to know everyone's name by 930. All though fate and Life have been playing havoc with this one and I am trying to get 6. Mostly so I can run some of the drills I would like to teach and keep the cycles going.

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#9 CENTCOMSurvivor

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 09:05 AM

Have fun tomorrow guys!
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#10 Davis

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Posted 10 November 2013 - 09:37 AM

Hoping somebody will post some pics up of the class, so I can see what I missed out on.

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#11 PsychoFish

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Posted 10 November 2013 - 06:06 PM

BAAR (Bass' After Action Report):

Granite Firearm's "Patrolman" Tac-Med 101



I just got home after attending this class, and let me say, holy cow am I tired, sore, stiff, and most of all better prepared. Something that lacks in training provided by most agencies is on medical unfortunately. This leaves it up to the individual to seek out and attend their own training if they feel the agency's training isn't up to their standards, or doesn't fill a niche in their job. Tactical Medicine Under Fire is a great example of this. Every two years I'm required to attend a basic BHLS/CPR class, prove I can do CPR, and then go home for a couple more years. Besides that, we get no emergency medical care. In my time on call outs, medical personnel will stage a block or more away if the scene isn't 110% secure. So what are you left to do in the mean time if you, your partner, or someone else has taken major trauma to their body, and the bad guy is still on the loose? This class filled in the blanks.

The class started simple enough, a run down on the most basic things everyone who carries a gun should carry in my opinion, a basic blow out kit. This section was taught by medical personnel who have done medical work both state side, and around the globe. They cover the down and dirty real life medical stuff. The more medical training you have going into this class, the better off you will be. This isn't the Red Cross certification "the scene is safe, I'm wearing gloves" type of medical. They cover the "sure the guy is injured, but we need to drag him to safety and worry about lead coming our way" type of stuff. They go on to pass out tourniquets, and show and tell how they are to be used. Each student uses a practice tourniquet and practices both applying it to themselves, and to other students. While brief in time, the knowledge is covered in depth and the class is involved by being asked questions which I love compared to being preached to. The school of thought for this whole class is to use only what is needed right this second so that a victim can be moved quickly. No need for mass quantities of supplies here, stop the major bleeding, and move them to a secure area so they can be treated to a further degree. Again, this isn't a first aid class, this focuses on real life hot scene tactics with injured people and how to handle it.

After that, everyone was given a chance to shake the cobwebs out, and fire a handful of rounds while practicing tactical reloads to re-familiarize yourself with your weapon platforms, and whatever choice of gear you decide to run. The freedom to chose what gear you wanted to run was one of my favorite parts. I began the class with a "battle-belt" and then switched to my work duty belt for the remainder to replicate what I'd have 99% of the time. Chest rigs, plate carriers, or simple pouches on your pants belt was acceptable as long as you could carry at least two full reloads for your rifle and pistol. After a few reloading/familiarization drills, it was time to go hot so to speak and dive into the meat and potatoes of the class.

For this class, since it was all LE oriented people attending, we moved into moving to cover, and engaging threats from behind cover. This was part of the tactical section. Keeping yourself from getting shot was the focus, while still getting solid combat effective hits on the targets, going over commands etc. While pretty basic stuff, it was used as a building block to get to the next level, and to ensure everyone was on the same page. It also forced the shooter to use both strong and support side shooting, another skill that is glanced over by many agencies and only covered at the three yard line.

Once that was completed, movement drills were added in, again, simply used as a building block. It was ran both solo, and with one other student to represent the initial officers going into a hot scene after responding. This forced the students to always maintain contact through communication, and peripheral vision. These drills were again ran with rifles and or pistols to simulate different situations, and at some points the only cover given to the student forced them to go prone and engage a target. After that, it was time to introduce the victim that would need to be removed from harms way.

In real life, help isn't always there to assist the injured immediately. If your partner goes down and the shooter is still mobile, fire and EMS will not enter the scene. This is a tricky situation. You don't want to leave your brother or sister in blue laying in the open exposed, scared, and dying while you watch and wait. Sometimes the choice is made to approach them, and get them out of the line of fire so that they can be tended to safely. The class then was given the opportunity to enter a "hot scene," approach at the ready, engage threats as they were called out, communicate with the victim, retrieve the victim, and continue to fire to end any other threats that were presented. This was accomplished by a life sized, weighted mannequin, an instructor followed behind the student to call out which target was a threat, and to be the voice of the victim. Students were encouraged to talk to the victim, reassure them, and try to gather as much information as possible while removing them from the scene. This drill was ran both solo, and with a partner. The partner scenario added to the situation by also having to have constant coverage, communicating what they were seeing, and engaging threats. Team communication was used by calling out movement, reloads, coverage, and direction before completing the action to ensure safety and total threat coverage.

During this, a scenario may change into an ambush with multiple threats being presented at once, this forced the decision to be made of abandoning the victim for the moment to engage all threats, communicate with your partner to seek cover, and to reassess the victim again.

Overall this class was an excellent example of things that must be done in dire times. Unfortunately this type of training isn't covered outside of high speed units such as a dedicated tactical team. The reality of this though is that in today's world it is now the first responders who are thrust into the situations, and are expected to act and react immediately.

While this class is geared towards those in a LEO capacity, the armed citizen can benefit from this training as well. In recent years active shooters/mass shooting have taken a sharp upward trend and have become more frequent. This training could very easily take place anywhere you frequent in day to day life. The victim may be your spouse, child, or co-worker, and the situation isn't much different for a civilian or a LE professional, remove the injured from a dangerous situation, and returned fire to the threat, and then begin treatment to try to save their life, or to delay death until advanced medical care can treat them. The class ended with each student receiving their own basic "blow out" kit containing brand new sealed items identical to those that they trained with during the class. A tourniquet, two trauma gauze packs, gloves, and a pouch to put it all in. A very simple, and basic kit that is small enough to ensure you will carry it, compared to other kits filled with so many supplies you may elect to leave it in your vehicles door compartment instead; thus rendering the whole idea void.


Again, on the forty minute drive home in the dark I went over the class in my mind. I walked into this class, knowing the instructors, but treating it as if I was just another student walking into a class like anyone else. The instructors were very clear on what they expected, how they expected it to happen, and presented each of their personal insight to help deliver the material in a way that you were able apply it to your own style and way of life instead of a "do it this way, because I say its best." I've already chatted with John again, and I plan on attending these types of classes in the future as a refresher as it pushed us to run our guns hard, make quick choices, and most importantly learn and maintain a skill set that may just one day save your loved ones life, or maybe your own!

Edited by Ken Bass II, 10 November 2013 - 06:07 PM.

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#12 PsychoFish

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Posted 10 November 2013 - 06:47 PM

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#13 CENTCOMSurvivor

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Posted 10 November 2013 - 07:58 PM

Good stuff and thanks for the quick AAR Ken. Great to see this type of training happening!!
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