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Survival Knife Help


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#1 emBARK

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 03:28 PM

I'm attending a survival course this summer and they have pretty specific knife specs. My Leatherman is the extent of my knife experience. Can anyone help me out? The following is the criteria that they are looking for. I hope to find something, that within reason I can beat on a bit, but doesn't cost an arm and leg.

"The Six things your knive must be able to do - 1. Be at least a 5" blade. 2. Be High Carbon Steel. 3. Be Full Tang. 4. Have a 90 Degree Spine. 5. Strike with Flint. 6. Be a NON Coated blade."

#2 SteveSOS

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 03:49 PM

Knives are dependent on the user... Id stay away from most of the cheaper stuff that you can buy as most of it will not have the ability to survive the course. 

 

I use a Fox Parang personally but its a bit large and has some inherent flaws:

 

  • Cant use it for gutting effectively
  • Cant use it for fine work

One thing though that you cant really beat is anything in the Esee knives line. Great utilitarian blades that will outlast your great grand kids. Then there is a whole plethora of knives at TOPs that are great as well. I used a Tops Tom Brown Tracker for a long time until it was stolen off my desk at work. It had the same flaws as the parang above. Its why i usually carry my parang and my Leatherman. One for gross work, building shelters etc. The other for gutting, cleaning, fine motor work. The other downfall is most of the knives that are worth it, including the ones I mentioned above are $150 bucks or more.


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#3 leosavage

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 01:48 PM

Tops dragonfly 4.5 great knife. Fills all those specs can be had for around 130.00 bucks. The Ontario sk5 black bird.. It is 154 cm stainless but it throws a great spark about the same price. I am a big fan of blind horse and bark river knives but the are pricey but can be had in the 130 to 200 dollar range and have many styles to choose from. I can answer any questions you may have about most knives and steel. I have a major addiction to knives lol

#4 emBARK

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 05:47 PM

Decided on a Kabar BK10. I'm stripping the blade, forcing a patina, new scales, sharpening convex, and having a kydex sheath made with a teklok. It's 1095 so as long as I take care of it, it will be good to go.

#5 leosavage

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 06:18 PM

1095 cro van that Becker uses is pretty good steel it's a lot like the old cold steel carbon v. Takes a good edge and is easy to re sharpen the edge on it is very thick out of the box so thinning it down will improve the proformance a good bit just remember 1095 is like all the old 10 series carbon steels very rust prone even the patina won't keep it from getting red rust and pitting so keep her dry. All in all the bk 10 is a good choice it's a tough one. Good luck with it I'm sure you will like it.

#6 emBARK

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 07:16 PM

Although I've already ordered scales, they're interchangeable and my sheath won't be made till the scales are done.

Is the BK10 a better all arounder than the BK2?

#7 leosavage

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 08:44 PM

I'd say the 10 is a better choice for a general survival bushcraft type knife the 2 is a pretty heavy knife for its size and can be tough to do some field craft jobs with but no knife is great at everything. I really like what Becker does with their knives very simple no bs tools just don't expect it to be super sharp out of the box some of them I've seen were but most aren't but all of them will take a good edge with a little work. I recommend you get a leather strop and some compound to maintain your edge. White and green are the most useful. There is a great seller on ebay that makes em. I saw a 2 sided strop with white and green compound bars for I believe $ 25 shipped. Stropping makes a world of difference in sharpness and prolongs the life of your knives and it's super easy to do.

#8 B3dlam

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 02:19 PM

I would say get the Gerber LMF II but it has a coated blade I beleive it meets all the other requirements.  I used one in the survival school we are required to take up here and had zero issues with it and I beat it to hell batoning through logs and such.  That said I am sure you will get some great options here. 


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#9 leosavage

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 03:00 PM

The lmf isn't a bad knife but I réally am leary of Gerbers quality control. It's a shame since they used to be a very good maker. Now I'm not saying all their products are bad but I've seen more than a couple fail under normal use. The steel they use is sometimes very poorly heat treated leaving it brittle. For the price of one of Gerbers better knives or maybe a little more or even less you can get something much better and safer to use.

#10 mangeface

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 04:03 PM

I agree on the Gerber QC being questionable. I've had a few of their products fail on me, one being my military issued e tool while digging. Yes, digging dirt.

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#11 emBARK

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Posted 10 March 2014 - 07:22 PM

Digging, bet that ruined your day.

#12 SteveSOS

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Posted 31 March 2014 - 11:01 PM

I ran a Tom brown tracker until it was stolen off my desk at work. Switched over to a fox parang and love it
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#13 leosavage

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Posted 01 April 2014 - 05:43 AM

I like the looks of those fox parangs. I was in the market for a new chopper a year or so ago and being the Bark river addict I am I went with the grasso bolo 3 with the toxic green g10 handle. Man that thing is a Hell of a tool. Worth every penny I spent on it.

#14 leosavage

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 04:31 AM

A nice budget option out there is the svord kiwi general purpose outdoors knife. It's like a convex mora on steroids. It's not a pretty knife but it has all the things you want in a beater knife. The thing that stands out about it though is its a $ 40 knife with a Swedish Sandvik l6 tool steel blade that can take and hold a razor edge. L6 isn't a very common steel in production knives. It's the steel used in industrial sawmill blades and can't be found in many other forms in smaller sizes. Good stuff very tough and easily sharpened




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