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Save w/ a DARK kit


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#1 Jersey0311

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 10:46 PM

Hey all,

 

Below is part of an AAR I sent to Kerry Davis to post on his FB page about the recent save I had w/ his DARK kit. This is the second time I've used it. The rest of it should be up on his FB page within the next few days.

 

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I get dispatched to the bleeding in the supermarket. As an EMS provider in a relatively busy system, I shrug it off. I've been running nonstop all day, and I'm seriously expecting this to be some bullshit patch job.


Oh, how wrong I was. Complacency kills. See a trend here?

I pulled up and saw the panicked look on the store employees faces as they met me outside. I chalked this up to the usual jitters I see everyday. They were making comments which made it sound like it was the end of the world in there, and that it vaguely resembled a crime scene. Again, I shrugged it off.

I rounded the corner to the aisle and see my patient laying on the floor. He's white as a ghost, and I'm looking at what appeared to be anywhere from 350-500cc's of blood on the floor. This is a retarded amount of blood, and on the floor it looks like someone just dumped a bucket of it everywhere. Thank God it wasn't shark week. One of my cop friends is on scene holding pressure on his ankle, unsure of where the actual wound is, because there's that much blood.

Long story short, he was walking in the aisle when he noticed his foot was bleeding. Next thing he knows, he's laying on the floor covered in blood.

Because I had absolutely no idea where the hell this guy was bleeding from, and looking at the sheer amount of blood on the floor, and that I couldn't palpate a radial pulse (very, very bad), he bought the tourniquet. I applied the CAT in his groin, as high up as possible.

Some might ask, why the TQ? It wasn't an arterial bleed!

It's important to note that the blood was dark red in color. Venous bleeding is still deadly. Just because it isn't bright red, and squirting everywhere doesn't mean it's any less dangerous. Oozing venous blood will still kill you, just a bit slower. Any bleeding is bad. Therefore, stopping the bleeding is paramount, especially if you don't know where the hell it's all coming from.

After the TQ was applied (don't forget to annotate time and check the distal pulse!), I used my handy dandy Rip Shears (old version) to cut off the rest of his pants leg, his shoes, and his socks in an attempt to find where he was bleeding from.

After searching for a bit, I found that he was bleeding from an old scab from varicose veins. The izzy bandage from the DARK kit was immediately applied with extreme prejudice.
 

Vitals were as follows. BP 80/40, Pulse 50 and weak, Resps 12

Unfortunately in the process of getting the TQ and the Izzy out from the kit, the rest of the contents spilled everywhere and fell in the pool of blood. Thus the rest of the kit was lost, because fuck that. Bloodborne pathogens are no joke. Even the pouch was a lost cause. (same thing happened in save #14, sorry Doc!).
 

However, Kerry and I both agreed that it was a small price to pay for the outcome. The guy made it, in no small part due to the DARK kit (that I had with me, hint hint)

 
I'm a shit magnet. I'm almost reluctant to get a new kit from Kerry because if the past is any indicator, it's just going to get used within the next few months or so again, LOL
 
Anyway, I've run my suck for long enough. Get trained. Get equipped. And get pockets to carry your shit. Seriously. It ain't doing any good just sitting at home collecting dust.
 
You're more likely to use medical skills than gunfighting skills. There were days in Afghanistan where I went through more tourniquets than I did magazines.

I'll let you in on a little secret. Everyone is so hell bent on being some tacticool gucciflaged mall ninja beating their dick to the latest Kryptek covered BFG-9000 freedom dispenser, yet they can't handle a medical emergency, which is way more likely to happen than running into some ghetto gunfighter sent by the current administration to cap your ass.
 
My point? Get medical training. Seriously. That shit should be a required life skill. I'm not saying everyone needs to be an EMT, or Paramedic, Nurse, whatever. Put yourself through Kerry's class. Trauma management is generally easy to learn and retain for the layperson. I'm not asking people to learn how to differentiate lung sounds or read 12 leads, but if you can stop life threatening bleeding or open up someones airway before I get there, then you've made my job easier, and potentially saved a life. You don't have to be a surgeon in order to control bleeding.
 
Hope this convinces more people to EDC some sort of medical gear!

Edited by Jersey0311, 31 May 2014 - 05:01 AM.

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#2 mangeface

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 05:39 AM

Seriously dude, you're like, the ultimate shit magnet when it comes to people bleeding profusely.

 

Good job though.


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#3 DeathwatchDoc

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 06:33 AM

You really do seem to have stuff that finds you...

 

Really a strong case for medical EDC.


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#4 iExpresso

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 08:08 AM

Awesome! Thank you for sharing!
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#5 LongHaul

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 08:35 AM

Thanks for the detailed AAR. Definitely sobering and motivating.


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#6 Jersey0311

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 08:44 AM

I'd like to point out that if the cop on scene (who was also an EMT I used to work with before he got OTJ) had a DARK or similar equipment, the pt wouldn't have lost as much blood.

 

Not so subtle hint to the LE guys out there, LOL

 

Assuming your agency policy doesn't prohibit that sort of thing, of course


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#7 bruceleroy

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 11:35 AM

Good post with some very salient points that many people need to hear about. I have drawn my concealed weapon twice, never having to discharge it. I have had to apply more than a half dozen tourniquets to people I have come up on in need. I am a medic, I fancy myself as a competent shooter, but I am first and foremost a realist.

 

Get training that is affordable, get some gear, get some like minded friends and practice with each other! They may need to save you one day.



#8 Davis

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 01:51 PM

Awesome AAR, thanks for the posting it Jersey. 


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#9 B3dlam

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 02:02 PM

Not sure if its fair to be a shit magnet when you are an EMT not like you walked in on it as a civy ;-)  Great work though glad you sorted the guy out.  Your post reminded me of their kits I have been looking at their kits on and off for a while now. 


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#10 CENTCOMSurvivor

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 06:55 PM

Thanks for posting. I agree the LEOs out there need to be carrying some type of IFAK and at the very least a tourniquet. Does that agency not issue their people IFAKs? 

 

 


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#11 Jersey0311

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 07:56 PM

Thanks for posting. I agree the LEOs out there need to be carrying some type of IFAK and at the very least a tourniquet. Does that agency not issue their people IFAKs? 

 

LOL brother this is NJ you're talking about. Such common sense doesn't apply here.

 

It's my hometown agency that I eventually hope to get hired on with. It's a good agency, but some shit is just retarded. For example, weapon lights aren't authorized on handguns, optics aren't authorized on patrol rifles, and that pitiful excuse for a first aid kit in their car is absolute garbage. They issue a bag valve mask with no O2 (which renders it essentially useless), a few bandages, and some dressings. It's a waste of space in all honesty.

 

Other than that and a few other things, it's one of the more coveted positions in the area. 10 new cars every year, top pay is 105k for patrol (after 9 years), and there's all the off duty work you could want. They have a part time SWAT team with 2 cops on it that are EMTs and have been through the TCCC course, and I'm hoping that when I get on, I can start to affect some change.

 

I've handed out IFAKs and other med shit to my friends on the road, and it's slowly starting to get a foothold in the department.

 

It's an uphill battle here in the blue states.


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#12 DeathwatchDoc

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 08:09 PM

It is indeed an uphill battle, but you are fighting the good fight... Save their lives in spite of themselves.


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#13 DieselD

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 08:41 PM

Good on you Jersey!

 

I agree that everyone should have some kind of training to at least control bleeding, cpr and clearing an airway.


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#14 Psybain

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Posted 31 May 2014 - 04:28 AM

Good aar. This exactly the reason why I went with TCCC training last year when ammo pricesshot up sky high. I dont regret that decision in the slightest.
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#15 Jersey0311

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Posted 31 May 2014 - 05:00 AM

Good aar. This exactly the reason why I went with TCCC training last year when ammo pricesshot up sky high. I dont regret that decision in the slightest.

True story my friend.

 

I've said it multiple times, but the aftermarket TCCC courses are almost always better than the "official" TCCC course.


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#16 sabb

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Posted 02 June 2014 - 02:54 PM

There's only one thing worse than a varicose vein bleed, and that's a fistula bleed.



#17 Archangel1

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 09:31 PM

Asked one of my buddies who is a former Navy Medic to train a few of us in TCCC+.

What supplies do you think we need to know how to use and what should we cover?
I'm at:
Israeli bandage
CAT or SOFT-W
Rolled Gauze or Z-PAK
QuickClot
Chest seal
Maybe a decompression needle
CPR
Burns
Splints
?
Thanks,

A
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#18 Jersey0311

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 06:53 AM

Asked one of my buddies who is a former Navy Medic to train a few of us in TCCC+.

What supplies do you think we need to know how to use and what should we cover?
I'm at:
Israeli bandage
CAT or SOFT-W
Rolled Gauze or Z-PAK
QuickClot
Chest seal
Maybe a decompression needle
CPR
Burns
Splints
?
Thanks,

A

 

Have him show you how to improvise items as well. That's important. Obviously carry the right shit with you if you can, but for those times where you're caught with your pants down, it pays to be able to improvise. Think about what the bystanders did at the Boston bombings. First responders were overwhelmed. If the bystanders didn't do anything, I'm convinced that there would've been more dead people.

 

Be careful with the needle. Needle decompression isn't difficult, but requires practice. Be sure to trace the needle above the rib as you go in, because running alongside the bottom of every rib bone are nerves, arteries, and veins. You definitely don't want to nick that shit.

 

I'd also ask him about NPAs. bigpac931 disagrees with me on this, and you'll find varied opinions on it, but I think NPAs have their place. It ain't the same as intubation, but it's something.

 

CPR is easy. 3 fingers above the sternum, midline with the nipples. Interlock your fingers with your hands on top of each other and keep your arms straight. Compress the chest with the palm of your bottom hand. Don't push with your elbows. Lock your arms and bring your body weight down. Do hands only CPR, none of this mouth to mouth shit. Gotta keep the blood pumping. If you break a rib it's ok, it happens all the time. Kids are a different story however.

 

For burns, just use a dry sterile dressing.

 

Also, the Navy doesn't have Medics. They have Corpsmen, and they're some of the best in the business.


Edited by Jersey0311, 25 August 2014 - 06:53 AM.

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#19 Davis

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 09:43 AM

^ What Jersey said!

 

I would also put emphasis on proceeding with caution regarding the needle; unless you are medically trained and have the ability to practice regularly for proficiency I would stay away from it as you could do more harm than good. And I also second the NPA being part of the kit and training. There are folks that say the are not needed and it's always a point of great debate, but they can and do serve a purpose and one should be part of your kit (with some lube).


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#20 Scuba CN

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 11:22 PM


CPR is easy. 3 fingers above the sternum, midline with the nipples. Interlock your fingers with your hands on top of each other and keep your arms straight. Compress the chest with the palm of your bottom hand. Don't push with your elbows. Lock your arms and bring your body weight down. Do hands only CPR, none of this mouth to mouth shit. Gotta keep the blood pumping. If you break a rib it's ok, it happens all the time. Kids are a different story however.

 

Have agencies officially gone to compression-only CPR? Last I heard it was still just a proposal but with growing support from first responders. I also seem to recall someone saying that if you don't hear cracking you're not doing the compressions right/deep enough.






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