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Vehicle Lockout

lockout keys break in

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#1 Koopa

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Posted 07 September 2014 - 08:33 PM

Today I had the unfortunate experience whereby I locked all three of the keys inside my vehicle. Very embarrassing, I know. Still trying to figure out why/how this happened. Fortunately, it was a beautiful day, I was in the middle of a corn field, and I didn't have anywhere to be. So I had plenty of time to figure this out. 

 

It got me thinking, though, about what I would do if I was in a less desirable environment when this occurred, i.e. a shady urban area, being pursued, unfavorable weather, or (most likely) running late for something. 

 

As a rescue squad technician, I know exactly how to gain access to locked vehicles. However, in that particular corn field, I didn't have any of the tools I needed. I tried using a wire coathanger to hit the lock several times, with several different thicknesses of wire. All I managed to do was destroy the rubber weather seal between the door and the body. Eventually, roadside assistance showed up with the tools I needed, and I was back in the vehicle within a minute.

 

This is the first time I've ever been locked out of my vehicle, and it will probably be the last. But, just to play it safe, I want to take a much more proactive approach to this situation. I've already decided my next vehicle will have keyless entry.  But in the meantime, I've been thinking of concealing a key somewhere on the exterior of the vehicle, or attaching forcible entry tools to the undercarriage.  But I'm sure there's a better way.  I thought of using lockpicks as well, but I wasn't sure if/how a car lock could be picked.

 

What do you recommend, and how would/did you handle being locked out of your vehicle? 


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#2 Davis

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Posted 07 September 2014 - 08:57 PM

I drive a Ford so it has a keyless entry keypad on the door... handy feature as I do not have to worry about locking myself out. Previously though, I always kept a backup key in my wallet. Most modern vehicles now have "smart" or "chipped" keys, but if you go down to a key making place you can still get a "normal" key made for a few bucks. It will not start the vehicle but it will unlock the door to allow you entry to get to your ignition keys that you locked inside. 

To make the key fit nicely in my wallet I would melt the rubber/plastic off it is so as to have a nice thin profile. 

 

As far as storing a "hidden" key, I've always been opposed to that idea personally... I figure if some ass hat is going to break into my truck I do not want to make it any easier on them in the rare chance they are smart enough to search for a "hidden" key before breaking a window. 


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#3 Jersey0311

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Posted 07 September 2014 - 10:31 PM

I drive a Ford so it has a keyless entry keypad on the door... handy feature as I do not have to worry about locking myself out. Previously though, I always kept a backup key in my wallet. Most modern vehicles now have "smart" or "chipped" keys, but if you go down to a key making place you can still get a "normal" key made for a few bucks. It will not start the vehicle but it will unlock the door to allow you entry to get to your ignition keys that you locked inside.
To make the key fit nicely in my wallet I would melt the rubber/plastic off it is so as to have a nice thin profile.

As far as storing a "hidden" key, I've always been opposed to that idea personally... I figure if some ass hat is going to break into my truck I do not want to make it any easier on them in the rare chance they are smart enough to search for a "hidden" key before breaking a window.

You drive a Ford?!







Chevy all day brother.

Edited by Jersey0311, 07 September 2014 - 10:34 PM.

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#4 Davis

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Posted 07 September 2014 - 10:52 PM

Haha! If the golden bow ties were not the biggest pieces of shit on the road I would happily drive one... but they are, at least the ones I've owned have all failed me, especially my Tahoe. Oh, yeah, and the fact that Chevy did not have the balls to stand on their own but had to take Obama bailout! Ford on the other hand stood on their own and the 2013 F-150 (my truck) was the most American made truck in 2013 and again in 2014 because they are committed to America. So America!  :headbang:

 

As for the jackwagon in the videos... well I don't know quite what to say about him other than he is a sad and confused little man who is clearly an Obama voter because he whores himself out for the Obama brand! LOL

 

Okay, all kidding aside, I am a Ford guy, but I think it's pretty much six of one, half a dozen of another. They all make good products and will take care of you if you take care of them... unless you just get a lemon, which happened to me with my Tahoe, but I don't hold that against Chevy. 


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#5 AaronK

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Posted 08 September 2014 - 05:46 PM

Ford on the other hand stood on their own THIS TIME AROUND and the 2013 F-150 (my truck) was the most American made truck in 2013 and again in 2014 because they are committed to America. 

 

Fixed it for you.

 

 

Kidding aside, my truck has keyless entry which I always use to lock it. In the event that somehow fails me and I really screw up, I always carry a spare key in my wallet. I'm also opposed to "hidden" keys somewhere on the vehicle on the off chance that someone were to find it.



#6 paulalfaro

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Posted 15 September 2014 - 09:44 PM

always stashed a key in my wallet, trimmed as minimal as possible


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#7 AaronK

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Posted 16 September 2014 - 05:54 PM

That's smart...I never thought about trimming my backup key


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#8 Hidyn

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Posted 19 September 2014 - 05:23 PM

I've been meaning to get down to some of the hardware stores and lock shops to see if I could get a simple door key made for my gigantic dealership chipped key.

Glad to know someone has had success!

I tried to do away with the lanyard Ive been using forever due to snagging it and leaving my keys hanging on equipment with some regularity (Always a bad play). I picked up a belt mounted silent key carrier, which works like a charm and frees pocket space, except I overlooked my monsterous vehicle key!

...so Im still rockin a lanyard. For now. :)

#9 SteveSOS

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Posted 26 September 2014 - 07:20 PM

what kind of vehicle did you have?


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#10 Hidyn

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Posted 01 October 2014 - 06:28 PM

...........Mazda 3.


It has high maneouverability!!


.........I bought it because I'm a cheap bastard who hates spending all my money at the pumps......

:(

#11 PSDRyan

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Posted 20 October 2014 - 05:37 PM

I have a Ford with a keypad, and deleted all my manual locks because around here they get punched all the time.  But you could keep a pressure cuff hidden somewhere underneath the vehicle.  Wedge it between the door and body, then pump it up and you'll have room to unlock with a hangar, stick, or whatever.



#12 kf4lhp

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 10:13 PM

My old Chevy Blazer had a door key zip-tied under the body. You had to get nasty and really crawl up under it to find it, and where it was tied was on top of a rail so it couldn't be seen, but just grab and twist the key and it'd break the tie, no tools needed. Saved me $90 once.

 


This is the first time I've ever been locked out of my vehicle, and it will probably be the last. But, just to play it safe, I want to take a much more proactive approach to this situation. I've already decided my next vehicle will have keyless entry.  But in the meantime, I've been thinking of concealing a key somewhere on the exterior of the vehicle, or attaching forcible entry tools to the undercarriage.  But I'm sure there's a better way.  I thought of using lockpicks as well, but I wasn't sure if/how a car lock could be picked.

 

What do you recommend, and how would/did you handle being locked out of your vehicle? 


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#13 SacRyan

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Posted 19 November 2014 - 11:19 AM

I've got a Ford with a keypad but some ideas...

 

additional key in wallet or phone case

paracord - tie loop, grab door handle or lock with it

practice your hanger skillz - learn where the lock bar is and use like a slim jim instead of hitting lock?

large rock

smaller rock

boot

unsavory urban assistant's head

the force

 

:cool:


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#14 MR.RED

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Posted 19 November 2014 - 11:50 AM

I have zipped tied an extra key on the under carriage of each of my vehicles. They are not in easily accessible locations, ie. you can't just reach under and retrieve them. I check them often and have used them often.


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#15 flashlightsolutions

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Posted 06 December 2014 - 04:59 PM

Been there done that several times.

 

The most embarassing where locking the keys on the pump line in the gas station. And on the wash brush line. In the same gas station!

I also had an even harder incident. the key broke in my pocket late night in another town!

 

Since then I have made a non-immoblizer key copy and carry it when i am around town. 10 miles further, than i get my 2nd key.

 

One more suggestion for a hidden key. Clear your trunk and search for 1 or 2 rubber plugs that are there to drain liquids.

Get under the trunk bed and check their position.

Now you can improvise a hideout.



#16 xjmv

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Posted 12 December 2014 - 08:55 AM

I found this out few weeks ago and I plan to buy one for the girlfriend:

 

http://www.amazon.co...ords=hitch safe


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#17 pira114

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Posted 13 December 2014 - 05:02 AM

I found this out few weeks ago and I plan to buy one for the girlfriend:
 
http://www.amazon.co...ords=hitch safe


Only sketchy part about that is the hitch pins being locked inside. If the lock fails and you can't open it, you now have to cut it off to use the hitch receiver. If you can even cut it off without damaging the receiver. It's not without it's merits, but this aspect would worry me. I have no clue how likely that lock is to fail though.

#18 AaronK

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Posted 13 December 2014 - 04:23 PM

Eh, the cover doesn't look all that strong. If the lock fails, I'm sure you could pry it apart. Or cut it open with a holesaw and then pry the cover off.

#19 xjmv

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Posted 14 December 2014 - 02:27 PM

Only sketchy part about that is the hitch pins being locked inside. If the lock fails and you can't open it, you now have to cut it off to use the hitch receiver. If you can even cut it off without damaging the receiver. It's not without it's merits, but this aspect would worry me. I have no clue how likely that lock is to fail though.

 

It is not a real problem... being a welder-mechanic, I'll get it out without any damage to the receiver...

 

Eh, the cover doesn't look all that strong. If the lock fails, I'm sure you could pry it apart. Or cut it open with a holesaw and then pry the cover off.

Yeah, just like it is easy to open up most car doors without key and to bypass few things to start the car without the key if you know what you do (okay it also depend on make and model I know!)... Anyway with the cap over it, 99% of people will see a nice rubber protector... It could not be worst than the magnetic plastic cases one can stick under the car...

 

But best advice is to always lock your door from outside using your remote or if you don't have a remote with the key. This is just an habit you need to take...


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#20 PHWOARchild

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Posted 15 December 2014 - 01:54 PM

I have zipped tied an extra key on the under carriage of each of my vehicles. They are not in easily accessible locations, ie. you can't just reach under and retrieve them. I check them often and have used them often.

I do something similar. For years if I was at the beach for the day and didn't want to carry (or lose) my keys, I hung them up under my car on a hook. I would drill a hole in the chassis and thread in a hardware store hook with a nut.

 

My new car has Onstar and someone locked the keys in the car on me accidently. One call to Onstar with my password and I was in. Recently the car was locked in my driveway and iced up, the key would not turn in the lock and the remote would not open it. I was stuck.. called Onstar and it was able to be unlocked from the inside.






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