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Tactical world, LE, FD, Security Jobs in Birmingham, AL area


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#1 RAIDERxSOFREP

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Posted 09 October 2014 - 10:03 AM

Does anyone know of any jobs open in the Birmingham area for someone starting a career in the public service and/or firearms and tactical gear industry?

 

Specifically someone who will hire someone that is...

 

19yrs old

Current military

Customer service and public relations experience

3 years retail/food service [Restruant, Bookstore, and coffee (barista)]

Wants to learn and grown in this field of work.

Will work around deployments, training cycles, and college

 

 

 

Any ideas? FYI I know it’s a long shot but I’m just throwing this out there to see what is there if anything

 



#2 Jersey0311

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Posted 09 October 2014 - 10:27 AM

Are you asking if you can get a sales gig at a tactical store of sorts?

 

Or you getting a public safety job?

 

Are you active duty?

 

Also, LE jobs generally require applicants to be 21. If you're active duty, you ain't gonna be doing shit as LE/Fire because the military is your primary job. The job requires that the employer has to grant leave for training, but that's for reservists. Active duty folks aren't considered unless they're on terminal leave or going to be discharged soon.

 

Keep in mind, at 19 years old, you don't have the requisite experience or know how to function as anything in the tactical industry, IE training, product reps, etc. Run of the mill AF basic training and security forces training doesn't cut the cheese when you're competing with serious meat eater types with way better credentials looking for jobs that have been doing it longer than you've been alive.

 

Don't mean to be a dick, but I'm in the industry and that's how it is brother. Get some combat experience, a few deployments, and attend some schools. Network, network, network, and you'll get your break. You have to distinguish yourself from other folks. There's plenty of 20 something security forces guys that wanna do high speed shit. Why should an employer hire you over them?

 

Things to think about.


Edited by Jersey0311, 09 October 2014 - 10:32 AM.

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#3 RAIDERxSOFREP

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Posted 09 October 2014 - 12:49 PM

Are you asking if you can get a sales gig at a tactical store of sorts?

 

Or you getting a public safety job?

 

Are you active duty?

 

Also, LE jobs generally require applicants to be 21. If you're active duty, you ain't gonna be doing shit as LE/Fire because the military is your primary job. The job requires that the employer has to grant leave for training, but that's for reservists. Active duty folks aren't considered unless they're on terminal leave or going to be discharged soon.

 

Keep in mind, at 19 years old, you don't have the requisite experience or know how to function as anything in the tactical industry, IE training, product reps, etc. Run of the mill AF basic training and security forces training doesn't cut the cheese when you're competing with serious meat eater types with way better credentials looking for jobs that have been doing it longer than you've been alive.

 

Don't mean to be a dick, but I'm in the industry and that's how it is brother. Get some combat experience, a few deployments, and attend some schools. Network, network, network, and you'll get your break. You have to distinguish yourself from other folks. There's plenty of 20 something security forces guys that wanna do high speed shit. Why should an employer hire you over them?

 

Things to think about.

 

Wow... Thank you!

 

To answer your first question (Are you asking if you can get a sales gig at a tactical store of sorts?) Yes

 

Second Question (Or you getting a public safety job?) If somehow an opportunity was open yes, I knew about the 21 thing I just didn’t know if there was a way for me to get my foot in the door and gain experience some place at 19.

 

Third Question (Are you active duty?) No, I regret not going active sometimes

 

 

"Keep in mind, at 19 years old, you don't have the requisite experience or know how to function as anything in the tactical industry, IE training, product reps, etc. Run of the mill AF basic training and security forces training doesn't cut the cheese when you're competing with serious meat eater types with way better credentials looking for jobs that have been doing it longer than you've been alive.

 

Don't mean to be a dick, but I'm in the industry and that's how it is brother. Get some combat experience, a few deployments, and attend some schools. Network, network, network, and you'll get your break. You have to distinguish yourself from other folks. There's plenty of 20 something security forces guys that want to do high speed shit. Why should an employer hire you over them?"

 

You’re not being a dick you’re telling the truth. I’m just confused a bit and also eager. I don’t really know how to gain needed experience at 19. And also deployments are hard to come by in guard. I have 6 years before I can go active or anything. The biggest career I have right now is in the coffee business as a barista. I have 3 years’ experience with that.... Enough with this rant!

 

Do you have any advice Jersy0311?

 

Also I did not mean to come off any other way then just I was looking for some wise advice from this industry.



#4 DirtyTrigger

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Posted 09 October 2014 - 02:34 PM

Ill say this. Being in the guard and being eager. You got 2 things going for you all ready. My advice while your kinda stuck being young? Go get some training. Classes, seminars, anything. Pick up a semester class at a community college or do research and go find the 2-5 day classes and training. Advice there? Keep quiet, stay in the back and learn. Both content from the course and how the big boys interact. Play it right and good chance someone will take you under their wing and you will learn more. I know, I've been in both roles.

If you can, A basic EMT course would be awesome. That will get you points anywhere you go.

Some day you will find your self in the market, more education (including community college) you get now will get you moved more toward the front of the line.
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#5 Davis

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Posted 09 October 2014 - 02:40 PM

RAIDER,

 

To jump on with Jersey I am going to give you the "No Kidding, Here is your reality" according to Davis... This is all my opinion but I think most the guys on here will agree. 

 

Because you are only 19 you essentially have an extremely limited amount of life experience and beyond formal education life experience and personal networking contacts is what gets you jobs.

 

That means that you need to get life experience and I know that it sounds hard because without working in the field how do you get it? Well there are a few ways and none of them are fast and even more so none of them are easy, they will require years of hard work, sweat, blood and tears, and I am not trying to sound dramatic or anything, but that is just the way it is. You will find on here there are a lot of guys that have years of hard work and life experience and they are still struggling to get the job they want. 

 

So first off you listed two very different career paths... one being basically in retail "tactical" gear sales and the other one being in the emergency services, i.e. LE or Fire/EMS. 

 

1) Tactical gear field... you may be able to go down to your local tactical gear and goodies store and get a job as a sales clerk because of your customer service experience, but I will tell you two realities; 1) most good tactical stores hire guys that have spent time down range or wearing a badge carrying a gun or otherwise responding within the 911 system because those are the guys that have actual first hand knowledge to give to the potential customers and; 2) Even if you do land a job selling tactical type gear in a retail store that will amount to next to nothing on your resume when trying to get hired for LE/Fire/EMS... they will view it has customer service/retail experience but you will not get any credit because you use to sell cool kit to guys. 

 

2) LE/Fire/EMS/ Public Safety in general... I'm getting the feeling that this is where you want to go with your life and that very good, serving your community/country/fellow citizen is one of the most commendable and rewarding things a person can do with their life. But you need to work to get there. Remember that you will never start out being high speed anything, you will have to start in the dirt and work hard to get up the ladder, it's just the way things work. So if you want to be a cop you first need to be 21 or almost 21. Many agencies will let people that are 20.5 apply because they know that by the time you graduate you will be 21. Fire/EMS will sometimes hire guys under 21 but it is getting extremely rare to see that any more because of insurance reasons. 

 

So what are your options... well find out if there are any volunteer fire departments in your area and if there are go volunteer and become a volunteer firefighter and bust your ass, work harder than any other person and put in more hours than anybody else. Go to your local community college and get your EMT certification and then use your EMT with the fire department and maybe get a part time job with the local ambulance company. Again, work harder than the next guy because it will pay off, it will take a couple years but people will notice. While you are doing this see if the local PD has any volunteer opportunities for guys under 21 and if the do, then do that too, even if it is some lame auxiliary type function and it seemingly sucks, do it! Basically if you do all that, then in two years by the time you are 21 you will have started to accumulate some life experience and during the process you will have made connections and networking contacts and when you go to apply for your first LE job with your local dept. you will be remembered as that kid that worked harder and did more than anybody else. 

 

A word to the wise though, if you do go this path, do not be that overly annoying kid that drives the guys nuts, be the one that works extremely hard, asks appropriate questions, does not talk too much and keeps his head down and does anything anytime he is asked.  There is a fine line there. 

 

Again this is just reality according to Davis so take it for what you will. I took a wilderness first responder class when I was 20 and thought it was pretty cool and then I went and joined the fire dept., volunteered my ass off to the point that it was basically a full time job; I put in exceedingly more hours than any of the career guys in both training and actual calls, I became an EMT though the dept., did back country ground based SAR, became a HazMat Tech, worked on the fire and arson investigation team, did fire code inspections and ended up as the lead drill grounds instructor at our fire academy; I did all that for about 5+ years but because of the hours I put in I would equate it to closer to 8 years if I had been doing the "normal" amount of hours. I got paid some money as I was technically paid per/on call with the dept. but I had to work another full time paying job on the side to pay the bills but I knew it would eventually pay off and it did. What I got out of it was some incredible life experience, something I would never trade for anything, but even more so I made a name for myself and to a place where some very influential people with impressive job titles would say very good things about me. I had to sacrifice a lot for it... very little sleep, no drinking (so I would always be available to respond) and limited time for personal life and friends, but it was worth it. Because I decided to put in for a job doing helicopter SAR for DOD contracts and even though I was not directly qualified for it I got it because the right people with the those important job titles I mentioned said some really nice things about me. Now just over 6 years later I am still working for the same outfit, I promoted up and currently work in the gear side of things designing new specialty SAR and some tactical related gear and it is a pretty good gig. I still have further life aspirations, such as a gun and a badge at some point, and I know that when I get to that point I will have a lot of great connections that will help me get there... all because I put in the time and worked for it.

 

If you are still reading, good job! I did not say all that to be mean or a dick, but to let you know that it takes a lot of work, but if you are willing to put in the time you will get there, but it takes time. 


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#6 DeathwatchDoc

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Posted 09 October 2014 - 02:49 PM

It can be a bit humbling to be told to make your bones, but making those connections and earning your stripes means a lot in this world. You have been handed some epic advice in this thread, take it on board and run with it. Davis, Jersey, and Dirty are being completely honest and up front with you. 


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#7 Jersey0311

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Posted 09 October 2014 - 03:16 PM

Wow... Thank you!

 

To answer your first question (Are you asking if you can get a sales gig at a tactical store of sorts?) Yes

 

Second Question (Or you getting a public safety job?) If somehow an opportunity was open yes, I knew about the 21 thing I just didn’t know if there was a way for me to get my foot in the door and gain experience some place at 19.

 

Third Question (Are you active duty?) No, I regret not going active sometimes

 

 

"Keep in mind, at 19 years old, you don't have the requisite experience or know how to function as anything in the tactical industry, IE training, product reps, etc. Run of the mill AF basic training and security forces training doesn't cut the cheese when you're competing with serious meat eater types with way better credentials looking for jobs that have been doing it longer than you've been alive.

 

Don't mean to be a dick, but I'm in the industry and that's how it is brother. Get some combat experience, a few deployments, and attend some schools. Network, network, network, and you'll get your break. You have to distinguish yourself from other folks. There's plenty of 20 something security forces guys that want to do high speed shit. Why should an employer hire you over them?"

 

You’re not being a dick you’re telling the truth. I’m just confused a bit and also eager. I don’t really know how to gain needed experience at 19. And also deployments are hard to come by in guard. I have 6 years before I can go active or anything. The biggest career I have right now is in the coffee business as a barista. I have 3 years’ experience with that.... Enough with this rant!

 

Do you have any advice Jersy0311?

 

Also I did not mean to come off any other way then just I was looking for some wise advice from this industry.

 

What the other guys said about volunteering w/ a Fire Dept or EMS outfit (or both, both certs are good to have) is one of the best ways into the first responder world. You get free training, and you start to network with responders across the community. Public safety is a very small community, and word travels quick.

 

I started working in the EMS field when I was still in high school. I started volunteering in 2007. Got my EMT in 2008, then left for the Marines after high school. Did 4 years, 2 deployments, and went to a metric shit ton of schools (some govt sponsored, some out of my own pocket). I networked like you wouldn't believe and left the Corps w/ a bunch of letters of recommendation in 2012. Went back to doing EMS full time when I got out while continuing to pad my resume for an LE job. In the meantime, during my TCCC recert, I was offered an instructor spot as a contractor doing TCCC/CLS training for deploying  .mil types and local first responders.

 

Shortly after that gig started, I was offered the chance to move over to the weapons/tactics side of the house for a full time instructor position. I interviewed, got torn to shreds, and got scheduled for another interview. Ultimately I had to turn the job down because I wouldn't be able to afford the cost of gas doing that full time. It was a tough decision as that's a job I've wanted for a long, long time.

 

So that being said, I continued doing EMS full time. I have 1 full time gig, and 3 part time gigs, plus the instructor gig. I stay pretty busy, but as a result, EVERYONE knows me around here. My network is impressive, and I've landed a few people some good jobs because I spoke to the right folks on their behalf. When you get a network, remember to pay it forward. When you become that guy that everyone wants to know, be damn sure you're generous with your help to those that deserve it. I didn't get to where I am without help, and now that I'm in that position, I'm happy to help anyone out that needs it, because I've been there and done that.

 

Yesterday I was hired for an LE gig. Oddly enough, I knew absolutely NOBODY at this particular agency, and applied randomly for the hell of it. Funny how shit works.

 

And to further back the points of Dirty and Davis, GET YOUR EMT. One of the reasons I was hired was because of my medical background, according to the agency. Medical training is always useful.

 

I'll end on a caveat for medical training as a means to an end. I understand that a lot of EMTs get their EMT for the sole purpose of padding the resume or for a job requirement. Those guys are the shittiest EMTs to work with and it shows in their work ethic and I'm sure their bosses will say the same when it comes time for the investigator to interview them.

 

It's OK to have long term goals. But in the meantime, you have to invest 100% in what you're currently doing, and give a shit about it. What does it say about an applicant that meets the minimum standards and scrapes by all the time at work? Is the hiring official going to want that kind of officer on their department?

 

Past behavior is the best predictor of future behavior. That is so damned true in regards to work history. If you bust your ass at your barista job, they'll know you'll bust your ass when you get a badge and a gun, or when you're on the engine rolling to a structure fire. It doesn't matter what you do before you make the leap to LE/Fire. What matters is that you have a solid work ethic and are a good worker, no matter what you do.


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#8 Jersey0311

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Posted 09 October 2014 - 03:18 PM

Also don't bother with the tactical store sales gig. 90% of the customer base isn't going to take a kid seriously when they're asking about weapons or gear that you've probably never used yourself.

 

I know when I go into the one by me, and I get stuck with some kid who doesn't know what he's talking about, it irritates the shit out of me as a BTDT type who wants a second opinion from someone that ought to know where I'm coming from.


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#9 RAIDERxSOFREP

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Posted 15 October 2014 - 04:31 PM

I first wanted to say that I am extremely humbled. The amount of out poor and advice you guys have given me here encourages me and motivates me. Thank you! Recently I was asked to go to a training class done by HTDIA. It’s a Tactical Options class. This opportunity has..... Enough with this! Cut to the chase I can’t give enough thanks to you guys! I’m truly honored and will do my best to keep focused keep busting my ass more and more and drive forward. Thank you guys and I hope I can be in your shoes one day giving the wisdom I learned along the way back to the community.



#10 DirtyTrigger

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Posted 15 October 2014 - 04:53 PM

"Thank you guys and I hope I can be in your shoes one day giving the wisdom I learned along the way back to the community"

This sir, shows you are on the right track. Don't be a stranger. Check in and let us know how it goes. If you do some good training, share what you learned.

Carry on!
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