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Time to buy new Axes...

axe geartasting

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#1 xjmv

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Posted 27 February 2016 - 10:17 AM

Hi guys and gals,

 

I love my chainsaw and I hate my old hatchet bought like 16years ago for few bucks... Only problem is chainsaw requires gas and weight much while backpacking....

 

So I am looking for your favorite axes, the one you use at home/cottage to split wood and the one you bring for backpacking trips. My goal here is to find alternative to power tools in case there is no power/fuel available or when power tools are just to bulky to bring.

 

I am looking to actually to buy and test the "Gerbe​r Gato​r Comb​o Axe II" for backpacking, does anyone tested it ? I like the fact to have both an axe and a handsaw into a "compact" combo.

 

For home/cottage, I`ve saw multiple models of splitting axe and I guess there will be a small process to buy few and just select my favorite unless someone knows about the perfect one. I am 6' 3" so long handles are preferred.

 

Thanks for your input!


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#2 Quietmike

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Posted 27 February 2016 - 09:31 PM

Depends on how much wood you're looking to cut.

If it's quite a bit, my favorite for backpacking is the Council Tool Boys axe.
Heavy enough for light felling, limbing, and with a profile that will do passable splitting.

https://youtu.be/Uv7dqBeCSTM

If a little smaller axe is called for, a Wetterlings #118 fits the bill.
19" handle and a lighter head. It does have a thinner profile so it bites deep for its weight.

I have both of these, and would immediately buy replacements if I lost them.

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#3 BTSmith10

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Posted 28 February 2016 - 12:55 PM

Check out the Art of Manliness website. They recently finished up a series of articles on selecting and using axes.
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#4 xjmv

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Posted 28 February 2016 - 03:35 PM

Check out the Art of Manliness website. They recently finished up a series of articles on selecting and using axes.

Thanks,

 

For others who might be interested, here are the 3 articles serie:

http://www.artofmanl...imer-on-the-ax/

http://www.artofmanl...ght-ax-for-you/

http://www.artofmanl...nd-effectively/

 

It contains lot of interesting information and the last part is one of the most important when you handle an axe.


- xJMV

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#5 ducttapedave

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Posted 06 March 2016 - 01:52 AM

I've used the smaller version of the Gerber combo axe for hiking. Be warned you can run into trouble with the magnet that secured the knife in my unit in. It dropped off splitting some logs into kindling. The hatchet itself worked fantastically however. Just something to be aware of. 

 

One of my full size axes is a Gerber and it works like a dream. I've split many a log with it, busted up palettes for fire pits and the like. I really like the hatchet for back packing. Small, light and gets the job done.

 

As far as a cottage based unit, well that is a whole other ball game. A ball game that would have many things to consider outside of price range. Materials of construction, intended use, weight and what have you. 


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#6 mackguy

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Posted 09 March 2016 - 06:14 PM

Fiskars tend to always win the Performance/cost ratio. I like both the ones I have.

#7 Koopa

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Posted 09 March 2016 - 08:40 PM

If you are looking for a chainsaw alternative, I carry something like this:
http://www.amazon.co...g/dp/B0002YPMSY

Super effective, compact and lightweight, does not require gas, does not make nearly as much noise. I wouldn't want to fell a Redwood with it, but it works for most camping and emergency applications.

In terms of axes, I still have my Boy Scout axe from years ago. Still works well. It's the right size for camping. Obviously for fighting fire a bigger axe is required....
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