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#1 B3dlam

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 02:55 PM

It looks like I will be able to finally get the Giant Schnauzer I have been wanting for a while.  I will likely be doing the puppy classes through the local petco as they happen to be about a half mile from my apartment. I mainly figure those will be good for the basics plus they are huge for socialization.  I am also talking to a relatively local K9 search and rescue group as being a working breed they really need to have a job and with my skill set search and rescue seems like a logical choice. 

 

I was just curious if there are any particular training references you guys have found helpful.

 

Also on a semi related note are there any particular accessories you have gotten and liked for your dog? Currently ontop of the basic stuff I am looking at a vest and ear protection.


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#2 decepticon1

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 03:32 PM

Check out leerburg.com

 

They have lots of dog handling supplies and I think also some scent training supplies. When we were training/traveling with dogs, the biggest issues were decent confinement within the vehicles and decent crates for the dogs on site, that would allow the dog to be safe and comfortable and also that would keep people from trying to mess with them. (both those who don't want to see more LEO, SAR dogs and those who feel that making working dogs work was somehow abusing them).

 

There are groups that do canine scent work as a recreational sport, which might be helpful if you are unfamiliar with scent training methods. nacsw.net

 

I think any working dog that will be handled in public needs to have a solid obedience foundation, for both handler convenience and liability issues. If your dog is bored and needs a challenge, consider working some dog agility or some rally obedience with him.


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#3 GrizCo

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 04:35 PM

As far as accessories:

 

http://www.rayallen.com/ right here in Colorado Springs, CO makes some of the best harnesses although $$$ but I spoil my dog more than my wife.

 

http://www.amazon.co...duct/B00SSGUIY6 is a really good vest with pouches that fit onto the Molle but I'm sure you probably have some spare pouches that work just as well.  My girl really loves this harness but I haven't ran it through enough tests to know if I would ever hoist her up with it.  I've rigged her to my chest to carry her across some bad terrain but not confident to hoist her up a rock wall. Just putting this vest on my border collie/pit puts her into work mode.

 

I work around a lot of metal shavings, sparks and loud machinery. So if she follows me around the shop:

 

http://www.amazon.co...-0-Inch-Currant

The only shoes I could find that stayed on her feet. Dogs front and rear paws tend to differ in size so I bought socks to accomodate the difference. You could order different sizes through the vendor but I prefer one size because I bought two sets in case I lose a shoe.

 

http://www.amazon.co...hiny-Smoke-Lens

A lot of dogs don't like wearing things on their head but my girl took to them off the bat.

 

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B002CZQ1T0 Mutt Muffs, great concept and my girl will wear them for a good half hour before ripping them off. Now when we are in motion she will keep them on for the duration but once she is in rest mode she takes them off if I don't.


Edited by GrizCo, 29 March 2016 - 04:37 PM.

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#4 Corbs

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 07:59 AM

It looks like I will be able to finally get the Giant Schnauzer I have been wanting for a while.  I will likely be doing the puppy classes through the local petco as they happen to be about a half mile from my apartment. I mainly figure those will be good for the basics plus they are huge for socialization.  I am also talking to a relatively local K9 search and rescue group as being a working breed they really need to have a job and with my skill set search and rescue seems like a logical choice. 
 
I was just curious if there are any particular training references you guys have found helpful.
 
Also on a semi related note are there any particular accessories you have gotten and liked for your dog? Currently ontop of the basic stuff I am looking at a vest and ear protection.

Check out cynology war labs which is part of US PALM and Combat K9, part of Fighter Design
https://uspalm.com/p...ology-war-labs/
http://www.fighterde...com/combat-k-9/
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#5 PSDRyan

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 10:14 AM

I've got a Blue Lacy blood tracker. He's pretty low maintenance. I've got a dog food subscription on Amazon. I groom him with a furminator and give him a quick bath maybe once a month.

On the training side...

Keep him on a leash at all times in the house as a pup. Take him out when he needs it, then right back in. Once he's older, he will never leave your side. Have a few chew toys, but not too many. The large antler sections are great.

When you walk him, and for obedience training, use a high quality prong collar. I love the ones leerburg sells. Walk him on the prong collar too. I use a short leash for walking that doesn't allow him very far in front of or behind me.

For off lead training, you can't beat a tritronics shock collar. Start with the prong collar, then start using corrections with the prong and shock at the same time, then with the shock alone, so he associates the shock with the prong correction he's used to. I use the beep when I give the "here" command and never as a correction so that if he's out of sight in the field I can easily recall him.

Working dogs love to have a job, so when he tracks, he's got an entirely different collar, and a 30 foot permatack lead. When he sees those come out, he gets super excited and knows it's time to work.

So to sum up what I've got as far as equipment...

Food
Stainless bowls
Metal cage
Furminator
Dog shampoo
Collar
Prong collar
Shock collar
Working collar
Short walking lead
Long working lead
Antlers
Tennis balls
Rope
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#6 B3dlam

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 11:44 AM

I remember a training Methodology for dogs that was out maybe 20 years ago talking about basically tying a short leash to your belt around the house so you have your hands free but it keeps the dog at your side.


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#7 GrizCo

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Posted 31 March 2016 - 04:56 PM

I rescued my pup when she was 10 months. I bought a slip collar as the sound of the chain across the loop accompanied by a sharp "NO" was enough to get the point across and it took an hour for her to stop pulling,be sure the slip collar is positioned high on the neck. Another hour to teach her to heel by keeping treats in my hand, rewarding her for staying by me and not passing me. My pup is happy that I lead because dogs want to follow a leader and not be responsible for leading. They have no idea where you are taking them when they lead, it's liking driving and having your wife give you directions. It stresses them out and makes them do things we don't want them to do like eat poop. The dog not the wife. If you lead they will follow like they are on a mission. I use military style prep commands, Name (get attention), command. I also use non-English commands. I'm sure you can find your own benefits in that. My dog after two months is only on a leash when it's posted that she has to be. Introduce hand signs along with the verbal commands and your dog will respond to hand signals. Since my dog follows me everywhere, I make an outstretched fist so she knows to stay put if I'm just going to go take a piss. It saves me from giving verbals all the time. A flat hand she lays down which helped me teach her to low crawl. If I point to my eyes she sits and watches intently on what I point at next. 

 

It's all about repetition and positive reinforcement. Vests are great. When my dog is in uniform. it's all business. It comes off and we play. The vest becomes an opportunity for them to please us and be rewarded. I need to look into the cobra buckle harness. I spoke with a friend about me taking her on a tandem jump so she can get her wings. Hopefully this summer. I never wanted a female dog but she had me at woof. I'm not a professional trainer but really it's no different than working with people that don't speak English.

 

On another note, register them as a service dog and you can take them anywhere, restaurants, grocery stores etc. Also landlords/motels can't charge a pet deposit. I only recommend this if your dog is obedient or else it makes your dog look like a crappy service dog.


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#8 B3dlam

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 07:33 AM

I rescued my pup when she was 10 months. I bought a slip collar as the sound of the chain across the loop accompanied by a sharp "NO" was enough to get the point across and it took an hour for her to stop pulling,be sure the slip collar is positioned high on the neck. Another hour to teach her to heel by keeping treats in my hand, rewarding her for staying by me and not passing me. My pup is happy that I lead because dogs want to follow a leader and not be responsible for leading. They have no idea where you are taking them when they lead, it's liking driving and having your wife give you directions. It stresses them out and makes them do things we don't want them to do like eat poop. The dog not the wife. If you lead they will follow like they are on a mission. I use military style prep commands, Name (get attention), command. I also use non-English commands. I'm sure you can find your own benefits in that. My dog after two months is only on a leash when it's posted that she has to be. Introduce hand signs along with the verbal commands and your dog will respond to hand signals. Since my dog follows me everywhere, I make an outstretched fist so she knows to stay put if I'm just going to go take a piss. It saves me from giving verbals all the time. A flat hand she lays down which helped me teach her to low crawl. If I point to my eyes she sits and watches intently on what I point at next. 

 

It's all about repetition and positive reinforcement. Vests are great. When my dog is in uniform. it's all business. It comes off and we play. The vest becomes an opportunity for them to please us and be rewarded. I need to look into the cobra buckle harness. I spoke with a friend about me taking her on a tandem jump so she can get her wings. Hopefully this summer. I never wanted a female dog but she had me at woof. I'm not a professional trainer but really it's no different than working with people that don't speak English.

 

On another note, register them as a service dog and you can take them anywhere, restaurants, grocery stores etc. Also landlords/motels can't charge a pet deposit. I only recommend this if your dog is obedient or else it makes your dog look like a crappy service dog.

 

I have looked at the service dog registration but as I understand you have to have an accepted disability for it to be applicable. 


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#9 GrizCo

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 08:18 AM

I have looked at the service dog registration but as I understand you have to have an accepted disability for it to be applicable. 

 

Registering requires no proof as your medical history is your own business. Registering is acknowledging you understand the responsibilities of a service dog and how they should behave in public. There is nothing stopping people from slapping a Service Dog patch on their dog, really you don't even need that. By law, people cannot inquire what your condition is or what the dog is in service for. 



#10 B3dlam

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 10:24 AM

I believe there is case law specifically dealing with housing however that basically allows a landlord to ask when it comes to allowing an animal on your lease. I believe its part of your accommodation request to provide the nature of the disability.


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#11 GrizCo

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 12:24 PM

I believe there is case law specifically dealing with housing however that basically allows a landlord to ask when it comes to allowing an animal on your lease. I believe its part of your accommodation request to provide the nature of the disability.

 

I was wrong as I should have said it varies state by state, I forget to consider everyone is from somewhere else. I live in a military town so even though I have documentation of my disabilities, my landlord never asked for anything.



#12 B3dlam

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 01:10 PM

I am hoping the fact that as soon as possible my dog will be getting certified in Search and Rescue will help. 


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#13 pira114

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Posted 01 April 2016 - 07:26 PM

As far as training goes, the latest episode of Ridiculous Dialog happens to be an interview with a K9 trainer about some of these training techniques. Just a conversation about some aspects, but I found it informative from a non handler point of view.

My dog is dead. But when he wasn't dead, he barked, pulled aggressively on the leash, wouldn't stay or come to me, and ate pine cones.

The bark collar (shock) taught him to not bark only when the collar was on. The choker/muzzle/pokie thingy leashes taught him to not pull only when they were on him. Etc etc. I did it all wrong and had a pet that was still awesome, but had zero obedience.

The RD episode vaguely touched on some of this and it clicked in my head how wrong I was. Might want to listen to the podcast and see if it'll help steer the right way. Or maybe at least it'll lead you to his website and maybe that'll have some info. I just can't remember the dude's name right now.

#14 Corbs

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Posted 02 April 2016 - 02:42 AM

As far as training goes, the latest episode of Ridiculous Dialog happens to be an interview with a K9 trainer about some of these training techniques. Just a conversation about some aspects, but I found it informative from a non handler point of view.

My dog is dead. But when he wasn't dead, he barked, pulled aggressively on the leash, wouldn't stay or come to me, and ate pine cones.

The bark collar (shock) taught him to not bark only when the collar was on. The choker/muzzle/pokie thingy leashes taught him to not pull only when they were on him. Etc etc. I did it all wrong and had a pet that was still awesome, but had zero obedience.

The RD episode vaguely touched on some of this and it clicked in my head how wrong I was. Might want to listen to the podcast and see if it'll help steer the right way. Or maybe at least it'll lead you to his website and maybe that'll have some info. I just can't remember the dude's name right now.

The Guy is Mike Ritland, I haven't listened to the podcast yet, but I have read some of his books:
http://www.amazon.co...ds=mike ritland

He is/was heavily involved in the SEAL K9 program.
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