It’s Not Survival Gear if it’s Not on Your Body - ITS Tactical
 

It’s Not Survival Gear if it’s Not on Your Body

By The ITS Crew

ITS Mini Survival Kit

We recently received a comment about our Mini Survival Kit and it got us thinking. Is the Mini Survival Kit worth it? Should people add this item to their list of gear to bring on camping and hiking trips? It’s a valid question and one that deserves further discussion.

The comment in question was:

“While I think that the concept is excellent, I am not completely ‘sold’ on the idea of a ‘Mini’ Kit. If you have some of these items in your ‘Go Bag,’ then your set.”

That’s a fair argument, but ultimately one that has some holes. Any number of circumstances can arise where you lose your bag full of gear, or are separated from the gear stored in a vehicle. Then, you’re suddenly left with what’s in your pockets, literally.

Example Scenarios

While it’s technically fiction, you can draw a possible scenario from the premise of Hatchet. A bush plane crashes in the wild and the pack containing essential survival items sinks with the plane. For most of the story the protagonist only has one tool, his hatchet and that’s because it was physically on his person.

Hatchet Book

For those not convinced that they would ever find themselves in a similar situation and think they would always have time to get their “go bag,” let’s look at the story of Stuart Nelson Jr. and his tale of survival that illustrates it can happen to anyone.

As the chief veterinarian for the Iditarod, Nelson isn’t unfamiliar with the outdoors. In fact, he’s previously taken over a dozen solo trips on remote Canadian rivers. Long story short, Nelson was kayaking when he hit a semi-submerged tree and became separated from his kayak. His inflatable kayak capsized and floated away along with his food, clothing, extra survival equipment and a satellite phone. All that remained were the basics that he had physically on him:

  • Knife
  • Snare wire
  • Signal mirror
  • Can of Sterno
  • Space blanket
  • Tincture of iodine
  • 3 fishing lures
  • Fishing line

Over the next 2 weeks, Nelson survived by eating plants and raw fish he caught. Keeping the fire going constantly was a chore, but obviously necessary to his survival. He also did the best he could to get attention from some planes flying overhead but they didn’t see his signs of “SOS” or “help” spelled out with logs on the gravel bar. He eventually spotted a group of passing kayakers and they helped him get back home.

The full story of Stuart Nelson is a compelling one and is a great read, check it out here on the Bonner County Daily Bee: [Part One] and [Part Two]. The title of this article also comes from a quote that Stuart shared in Part One of the article.

ITS Mini Survival Kit

The reason we brought up this comment and survival story is to show what being prepared actually looks like. Stuart Nelson was prepared. He had the proper tools to survive in the wild and more importantly, he had the knowledge.

To augment the knowledge on how to survive, which is primary, we’ve created a kit that’s full of life-saving potential and can fit in the palm of your hand. The contents of this mini survival kit took years to fine tune and adjust as we fought to provide quality equipment while keeping it available to most consumers. You can look around online and find more comprehensive kits, but the ITS MSK is a good balance of size, weight and products designed to provide you with the basics for survival.

ITS Mini Survival Kit

We also highly recommend you tailor your own personal kit to suit your needs, we’re in no way stating that this is the be all, end all of what you’ll need. However, one important note is that if you start adding a lot to your kit and it becomes bulky or heavier than before, you increase the chances of leaving it behind or not having it accessible when needed most. This kit won’t do any good if it’s not secured to your person.

The ITS Mini Survival Kit can easily fit in a front, back or cargo pocket and even in our EDC Slimline Pouch if you want to keep your pockets free for other things.

Would you be able to survive for two weeks in the Canadian wilderness with what’s in your pockets?

Are you getting more than 14¢ of value per day from ITS?

Thanks to the generosity of our supporting members, we’ve eliminated annoying ads and obtrusive content. We want your experience here at ITS to be beneficial and enjoyable.

At ITS, our goal is to provide different methods, ideas and knowledge that could one day save your life. If you’re interested in supporting our mission and joining our growing community of supporters, click below to learn more.

Discussion

  • Don’t forget that survival is contextual. Fish hooks will do you little good if a snowstorm or quake and a massive power outage leaves you at work in a big city ten miles from home in the winter with mass-transit out and the streets jammed with traffic. You need warm clothes, a little food/water, and comfortable shoes. A compass and map are also helpful for that long walk. 

    And don’t forget that emergencies are often accompanied by darkness. Have a flashlight on you at all times. As an ad used to say, “Don’t leave home without it.”
    Paulsen’s book, Hatchet, makes a great gift for a young boy to better attune him to the need to be ready for emergencies. I like how he has the boy learn from experience and by observation. He starts off knowing nothing and ends up quite wilderness savvy. There’s also an after-the-fact sequel called Brian’s Winter in which he isn’t rescued just as winter sets in. He has to learn to cope with the cold.

  • Mauro hott

    Well… carry-on EDC: wristwatch, smartphone, leatherman surge, small flashlight, peanut lighter, ferrocerium (all in the surge pouch), 2 folding knives, one small/one sturdy,  10 ft of paracord, 2 mini 22 kN carabiners (as keychains)  and 2 units of cotton embedded in vaselin, sealed in straws.
    Just the basics for a 30º S urban… should be enough to start with… and some skills.

  • SurvivalPunk

    I came up with a camera case with EDC in it always ready to go that has a carabiner clipped to my pants. This keeps my pockets free and camera cases are never noticed.

  • nDjinn

    I work from my desk at home, as such my desk is loaded with things I may need in an emergency. When not at home I am out on two kinds of jobs; one I carry emergency equipment as a matter of being a medic, The other is as a photographer and the top of my Hazard4 Photo Evac has a emergency kit that I load depending where I am going. But people, everyone should carry something

  • I think this ITS
    Mini Survival Kit would
    be helpful to survive for two weeks in the Canadian wilderness. Commonly
    our pockets are not able able to carry the many equipment separately.
    How much we try to carry in pockets make us uncomfortable. The ITS mini
    kit is appearing good fulfilling all basic needs.

Do you have what you need to prevail?

Shop the ITS Store for exclusive merchandise, equipment and hard to find tactical gear.

Do you have what you need to prevail? Tap the button below to see what you’re missing.