Jump to content


Photo

Firearms Training for Children?


  • Please log in to reply
21 replies to this topic

#1 gunnerjacky

gunnerjacky

    Landlubber

  • Crew Member
  • 19 posts
  • LocationBoston

Posted 15 July 2015 - 01:51 AM

Should firearms training be given to children? In Massachusetts any kid of 14+ years can apply for the firearms training. Don't you think that kids of 14 is not mature enough to understand the seriousness of handling a gun? O_O



#2 mangeface

mangeface

    Salty Dog

  • Moderator
  • 2,598 posts
  • LocationOklahoma

Posted 15 July 2015 - 04:38 AM

I was 13 and understood the 09/11 terrorism attacks. I know I would've understood firearms and the responsibilities that came with handling them.

So yes, I do believe kids can understand the seriousness and responsibilities that come with handling a firearm as young as 14, maybe younger in some cases.
  • CrazyD likes this

"I may walk among the sheep...but make no mistake, I am the sheepdog."
VQz5Nwz.png


#3 DieselD

DieselD

    Salty Dog

  • Crew Leader
  • 530 posts
  • LocationSW Michigan

Posted 15 July 2015 - 05:40 AM

Back when I was young we had firearms training at summer camp. I was 11 when I got my first NRA Marksman patch.

Also being raised on a farm I was around firearms, shotguns mostly, as long as I can remember.

 

I do believe it depends on the child and their level of understanding. Some kids today just aren't ready and may never be.


A government feared by its citizens is tyranny. A government afraid of it's citizens is freedom

III%er

CrewLeaderSignature.png


#4 SwatDawg335

SwatDawg335

    Salty Dog

  • Life Member
  • 452 posts
  • LocationLand of 10,000 Lakes

Posted 15 July 2015 - 05:48 AM

Neither of my kids are old enough to take a firearms safety course... That doesn't mean they don't already know how to safely operate one.  Further more, that doesn't mean they don't already know the severe, life-altering consequences of handling one without a qualified adult by their side.  I'm sure they'll both go through a safety course when the time comes, but I'm more than happy to handle the responsibility myself as well.


  • rottenit, DieselD, CrazyD and 3 others like this

NoTMZyB.png


#5 Alexander Garbuz

Alexander Garbuz

    Swabbie

  • Crew Leader
  • 46 posts
  • LocationMadison, WI

Posted 15 July 2015 - 09:07 AM

Should firearms training be given to children? In Massachusetts any kid of 14+ years can apply for the firearms training. Don't you think that kids of 14 is not mature enough to understand the seriousness of handling a gun? O_O

 

I started teaching my son when he was six. We used airsoft gun at that point. Last spring he first time fired Glock 17 and AK. He is eight now. I don't force it with him but also never tell him that I am too busy to show him my guns. I believe this is the best way to make sure there is not going to be a time when he decides to sneak up on me and try to take them to play with them. He knows the 4 rules of firearms safety and made him remember them. I repeat them with him every time we go shooting and I don't let him shoot until he repeats them back to me and explain the meaning of everyone of them. We are not doing any kind of actual shooting training - simply teaching him to be safe and treat guns with proper respect. 

 

11012009_10153214559063914_3326069546985


  • DieselD, wink and EMSWxSAR like this

CrewLeaderSignature.png


#6 hrddrv

hrddrv

    Mate

  • Crew Member
  • 75 posts
  • LocationArcher, Fl

Posted 15 July 2015 - 10:02 AM

My son gets a lesson almost every week. Mainly a few questions like do you ever touch a gun?, What do you do if you see a gun kind of thing. He just turned six. At the moment we don't own a lot of guns but the ones we do he knows not to touch them unless an adult is around. Same thing with my knives. I have a knife all over the house. The only time he has touched any of them is when I asked him to hand me one. He knows how to hand a knife to someone so that no one gets stabbed or cut. I was 8 when I received my BB Gun and 12 when I shot my first shotgun. With that being said I believe it also depends on the child. I would not let my friends 17 y/o son anywhere near my guns. He is very immature and just a all around bad kid. Even my friend has said he would love to own a gun but is afraid of what he kid would do.



#7 decepticon1

decepticon1

    Swabbie

  • Crew Member
  • 33 posts

Posted 15 July 2015 - 05:37 PM

My spouse, daughter and I are all certified shooting sports instructors with a national youth shooting program which starts kids at 9 years of age. Obviously, much of the initial training involves safety procedures, range rules, proper stance/body positioning, parts of the guns, etc. Our particular group offers rifle, pistol, shotgun, muzzle loader, and archery. But one of our goals is to get them shooting in the very first class.

 

We maintain a high instructor to student ratio and have a no tolerance policy for misbehavior. Many of our students go on to compete in various disciplines. We have two kids that are currently shooting with the Junior National Team and one that recently graduated from our program and has competed in the Junior Olympics. However, at our level we just focus on mastering the fundamentals and having fun. We also offer a living history class that has included such things as trebuchet, atlatl, blowgun, swords, axe and tomahawk throwing, etc.

 

The biggest age related problems that I have seen are that sometimes the youngest kids have a little trouble with attention span and settling down and upper body strength can be an issue for the smaller kids. We try to keep some smaller, lighter gear, but work them up as quickly as possible to more standard equipment.


  • DieselD likes this

#8 thevulpini

thevulpini

    Landlubber

  • Crew Member
  • 21 posts
  • LocationRichmond, CA

Posted 18 July 2015 - 12:26 PM

Paintball?

There is also something new starting up where actual guns are being used for modern training:

Clearing houses

Firefights

etc..

 

I am supposed to start with a new group of guys sometime soon, I've got a meeting monday involving it.

I dont know about children but I am 23 yrs old and they're worried I might use this training for bad

intentions. This doesn't have anything to do about me as a person but they're worried about the youth

getting the wrong idea when being taught these types of skills.

 

Like I said paintball really got me a good feel for how combat situations are and the nature of a firefight situation.

 

Good Luck


Edited by thevulpini, 18 July 2015 - 12:27 PM.


#9 pira114

pira114

    Salty Dog

  • Crew Leader
  • 1,195 posts
  • LocationSierra Nevadas

Posted 18 July 2015 - 05:11 PM

All my kids started cleaning and assembly/disassembly at 5 years old. A lot of it. It took all the "magic and wonder" away pretty quick. Each time, we went over rules and safety. About a year or so of that and they dreaded when I pulled them out. Until they finally got to shoot them.

At 10, they got their own pellet rifles. At 12, they got their first real rifle. Each trip to the woods includes more safety discussion. It's about drilled into their heads now. But they're still kids.

My 14 year old is about to start the high school trap team. That should help even more.

In short, there is never too young. And never poor students when it comes to kids. Only poor instructors.
  • DieselD and EMSWxSAR like this

#10 thevulpini

thevulpini

    Landlubber

  • Crew Member
  • 21 posts
  • LocationRichmond, CA

Posted 18 July 2015 - 06:00 PM

Should've read the topic a bit more thoroughly,

My first time shooting a gun, the gun was taller than me, not saying I was allowed/able/wanted to carry it around but I pulled the trigger, I was never able to carry a knife when I was younger but always managed to. When you are that young and a boy I know I was drawn toward guns and military things. I got my hunting license as soon as I was able and like I said earlier was playing paintball. My point is around firearms and guns there are always regulations safety rules and what not, they obviously go hand and hand, I do believe kids should be trained and introduced to weapons and bring the seriousness of what is going on in the world closer to home and at a younger age. All it will bring is good, kids will be more professional when handling these sorts of weapons.



#11 mackguy

mackguy

    Salty Dog

  • Crew Member
  • 460 posts
  • LocationLexington, NC

Posted 21 July 2015 - 12:00 PM

Maybe an outlier here, but I barely remember a time when I was not shooting something.  My grandpa got me a BB gun for my 6th (I think) birthday, but I had been shooting my brother's BB gun long before that... and dad would take me out back and we'd shoot his 22 Single Six and occasionally his 38 "detective special".  

 

I got my first .22 for my 9th birthday (single shot Stevens), and a .30-06 for hunting when I was 13.  

 

I was taught for as long as I remember that there's no such thing as an unloaded gun, and I even remember getting quite a spanking for pointing my toy "cap" gun at someone once.  

 

Where I see the most issues are people who didn't grow up with it, and decide to be interested once they're "of age".  One college friend in particular had grown up with anti-gun parents, but bought some cheap chinese semi-auto 12ga, and a few handguns in college... it was just scary being around him! 



#12 thevulpini

thevulpini

    Landlubber

  • Crew Member
  • 21 posts
  • LocationRichmond, CA

Posted 24 July 2015 - 06:01 PM

It seems like the children who grew up with anti gun parents and ended up purchasing weapons, (I say weapons in whole) wanted to show their parents something, like hey I'm bad.

A friend down the street had anti gun parents and would come over to my house with napalm and pipe bombs that he made at night.

 

So yes, very scary.


  • spenceman likes this

#13 Rulrofelves

Rulrofelves

    Mate

  • Crew Leader
  • 52 posts
  • LocationMid-California

Posted 27 July 2015 - 10:24 AM

My dad and grandpa started teaching me firearm safety and how to shoot at 3.  I was started on an old Benjamin pellet gun.  As I got older and matured, I was able to move onto bigger and better guns.  I don't get to shoot as much as I like, since being in California; but when I go home I take my daughter out shooting.  The attached picture is my 4 yr old shooting her pink 22 for the first time.  Kids that age soak up information like a sponge.  It is easy for them to glorify or be terrified by guns and weapons because of tv, movies, friends, etc...  Make sure that they get more good instruction to outweigh the bad.

Attached Files


  • DieselD likes this
"We the unwilling, led by the unknowing, are doing the impossible, for the ungrateful. We have done so much, for so long, with so little, we are now qualified to do
anything with nothing." Unknown

#14 mackguy

mackguy

    Salty Dog

  • Crew Member
  • 460 posts
  • LocationLexington, NC

Posted 27 July 2015 - 11:46 AM

Just wanted to throw an interesting observation out.

 

I had my CCH class on Saturday, and in NC there is a final live-fire qualification of 30 rds, 10 each from 3, 5, and 7 yards.

 

As I mentioned above I've been shooting for as long as I can remember, but until Saturday it had been around 7 years since my last range visit, even though the distances were short, I was a bit concerned that my basic skills may have waned, and others in the course were talking about how they had been "practicing all week" etc.

 

Based on my casual observation of the 11 students, the one guy who kept talking about his strict practice regimen scattered his 30 shots all over the target... "passing" but nothing I'd be proud of.  An older lady who commented that this was the first time she'd shot in 44 years, but had grown up shooting with her brothers on the farm (who was shooting a borrowed gun from the instructor) did quite well.

 

My result is not normally something I would be proud of (too many strays) but given the 7 year hiatus, and the fact that I don't think anyone else punched out the center of the target I'm OK with it.  

 

It also highlighted a need for more training/more creative practice, as I don't think I would have had these strays in a normal range visit, but this was the first time I ever had a "range master" shouting orders, and once or twice I was startled by another student firing their rounds.  If I'm startled by the range master/other students I would probably suffer much more in any real world setting.  Probably going to look into the NRA home and away from home defense courses soon, and maybe look into more specialized training down the road.

 

20150725_185147.jpg

 

But the moral of this writing is that I think my much better than average performance in this simple test is attributed to learning principles of gun safety and marksmanship at a very early age, thus the skills were still "serviceable" if not perfect even after an extended break.  


  • DieselD likes this

#15 gunnerjacky

gunnerjacky

    Landlubber

  • Crew Member
  • 19 posts
  • LocationBoston

Posted 25 August 2015 - 06:10 AM

In some countries like in India, parents are too afraid to teach their children how to shoot a gun. They don't believe their children can understand the seriousness of possessing a gun and they think they will shoot die shooting each other (accidently).



#16 mackguy

mackguy

    Salty Dog

  • Crew Member
  • 460 posts
  • LocationLexington, NC

Posted 25 August 2015 - 10:36 AM

Proper instruction from someone who theirself is a responsible and skilled gunhandler is a must.  If the parents are not thoroughly certain of their own safety then they certainly have right to be afraid of teaching children.

 

As a young'un there were 2 absolute rules

1) there's no such thing as an unloaded gun (also, no such thing as a "toy" gun)

2) absolutely no gun-handling without the presence of a guiding adult (dad, or on occasion grandfather)

 

Rule number 1 encompassed other basics like keep the muzzle pointed in a "safe" direction, though these and other nuances were enforced via rule 2.

 

This is why, more recently, I started becoming concerned when I saw references to "4 rules of gun safety" and similar things... I never learned a list of rules.. I was just taught growing up, kind of like riding a bike, walking, etc.. I wondered what I had missed with these "rules", and then reading the "rules" thought "well yeah, obviously".

 

My son now is 20 months, and I've been pondering getting dummy (airsoft or similar, unloaded) guns to sort of leave laying around as a training tool... at this age basically "don't dare touch that!"  Of course the "real" guns will stay in a safe or about my person... but I want to start with "guns aren't a toy" as lesson 1.  



#17 JackWilliams

JackWilliams

    Landlubber

  • Crew Member
  • 9 posts

Posted 15 October 2015 - 07:34 PM

Your choice to accept the responsibility to learn, practice and teach gun safety to your children and to do just that repeatedly, will determine the extent of your children's safety as a gun owner.


  • mackguy likes this

#18 mackguy

mackguy

    Salty Dog

  • Crew Member
  • 460 posts
  • LocationLexington, NC

Posted 16 October 2015 - 01:26 PM

Your choice to accept the responsibility to learn, practice and teach gun safety to your children and to do just that repeatedly, will determine the extent of your children's safety as a gun owner.

As I said, the biggest problem I've seen (aside from general nutjobs) are the ones who get their first gun at 18-21 in college, and know basically what they've been taught by Bruce Willis et al.



#19 pira114

pira114

    Salty Dog

  • Crew Leader
  • 1,195 posts
  • LocationSierra Nevadas

Posted 16 October 2015 - 06:49 PM

As I said, the biggest problem I've seen (aside from general nutjobs) are the ones who get their first gun at 18-21 in college, and know basically what they've been taught by Bruce Willis et al.


Best thing I learned from that group is that you rarely need to reload. Which comes in handy

#20 gunnerjacky

gunnerjacky

    Landlubber

  • Crew Member
  • 19 posts
  • LocationBoston

Posted 17 October 2015 - 01:20 AM

What's the news about a 9-year-old girl who killed her instructor with an Uzi? O_O Is that a news fake or real? Does anybody know about the real story? Check out this video


Edited by gunnerjacky, 17 October 2015 - 01:21 AM.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users