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Managing Expiry Dates + My new kit


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#1 Corbs

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Posted 02 February 2016 - 04:55 PM

I watched the Gear Tasting with Bryan's M9 aid bag, I'd been planning a main aid bag for my home and any vehicle based travel. I have two kits in my EDC bag(s), both of which are very much biased to trauma. I wanted a kit that would deal with the other issues that arise - burns, fractures, illness, allergies. As well as that, I wanted a more full on cover all kit that could be pulled in event of a major incident. It's still limited to my training, but covers more.
 
Bryan mentioned he set reminders for his medications on omnifocus, however I wanted to track everything and don't want that many reminders set, or be tied to a service. I've also been trying to track serial numbers on my high value EDC items, as well as maintaining a list for insurance and organisational purposes. My solution for that was a spreadsheet (yawn), which I've added the function to change colour when an expiry date is approaching or current/past. This obviously has the downside of needing you to check on it on ocassion.
 
The other thing I've done a little differently is the medication storage. I knew I didn't want to store everything in the cardboard boxes, it's bulky and they wear out fast in use. I also didn't really want to use pill bags, they can still be crushed and the seals are easily broken leading to contamination and water ingress. Instead, I've used sample pots with screw on lids. These are sold for craft storage and medical samples, as well as lab use. So far they've proven easily tough enough and are relatively inexpensive. I also stuck some printed labels inside with contra-indications and dosage information. These labels are part of the spreadsheet I mentioned earlier and automatically update the expiry dates.
 
From here on will be mostly lists and pics.
 
24413185509_a188d137b0_c.jpg
 
24154101113_2cdf4fe840_c.jpg Provided for illustration purposes, do not rely on these dosages or this information. Do your own research.
 
 
 
Tasmanian Tiger First Responder Move On - http://www.tacwrk.co...e-on-black-1114
24687183161_793c82f9eb_c.jpg Scissors are tethered with a lanyard. Cyalumes have pre-attached shock cord for attachment + buzzsaw.
 
 
The main pack and slim front pack seperate and join with a sturdy #10 YKK zipper.
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So many handles! The pack is easily lifted by any of them, but using two in concert keeps an open bag relatively together for hasty movement.
 
Main pack, main compartment
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Blue Box is burns kit, pouches contain goggles and velcro straps.
 
Front pack (trauma bias) laid open
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P1012156 by C0RBS, on Flickr
 
Open Panel
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Meds in plastic tubes are easily visible here. I love those little saline pods.
 
Closed pouch inside (PPE)
24152507344_db6e2cc12c_c.jpg
P1012159 by C0RBS, on Flickr
 
 
 
Looking for any input on what you guys think are gaps in the capability?

Edited by Corbs, 02 February 2016 - 06:44 PM.

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#2 pira114

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Posted 02 February 2016 - 05:56 PM

Brother, if an Aid kit could be called sexy, yours would be.

One thought. For that omnifocus thing, and your spreadsheet, how about having omnifocus remind you monthly to check the spreadsheet? That way you know at least once a month your kit is being evaluated for expiration dates.

As for the kit, it's pretty damn good. Mine differs in that I've focused on trauma management and transport. So I have a crap load of guaze, TQs, occlusive dressings, and NPAs. I've got several darts too, but they're there for those times when rescue might be a day away. Pretty rare. My whole plan is based on being able to get to advanced medical care within 24 hours.

I came to this plan when I realized that by myself, with my level of training, I was not going to be a field doc. I was gonna stop bleeding, protect airways, and transport. I've been to a lot of advanced first aid and trauma care classes. And none of that makes me feel I'd be helpful past the 24 hour sustainability mark.

That's just me. I've added several boo boo kits for when the family is out and about. All my meds go into that. I replace all of them the same time I replace the batteries on my Aimpoint. On my birthday every year. Just because

Edited by pira114, 02 February 2016 - 06:04 PM.

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#3 Corbs

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Posted 02 February 2016 - 06:37 PM

Pira, thanks for the comments, all well received.

 

I was trying to cover beyond those trauma focused kits I already EDC, especially as they're focused on size and weight constraints too, so getting more kit. I would still like to up the trauma management content of this pack, but generally things like TQs are pretty costly here, and I lack training for chest darts and NPAs. For a bit of context, the following is within reach at all times in whatever bag I'm running on a given day:

24689071091_19451fb190.jpg (EDIT : Pocket Med Pack actually has SOFTT-W, not SWATT. Now amended)

 

As for the reminder suggestion, that's a good one! This is in fact part of a larger spreadsheet that catalogs all my EDC and high value items, so I open it with relative frequency, and I figure that the way I have it set up with the colour coding gives me a 2 month window to notice and resupply. I like the aimpoint ritual too. Thanks for the first comment too, I'm inclined to agree. The custom patch may have been a touch over the top, but I reckon it works.


Edited by Corbs, 02 February 2016 - 06:40 PM.

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#4 Corbs

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Posted 04 February 2016 - 06:14 AM

I forgot to add, if anyone wants a copy of the spreadsheet to organise their own kits, PM me. I was going to attach to this topic, but you can only attach image files it seems.


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#5 stoddy9311

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Posted 19 March 2016 - 09:14 PM

Can't believe I missed this Corbs...good solid work!



#6 Corbs

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Posted 20 March 2016 - 09:28 AM

Thanks Stoddy, I've added a few bits and bobs, like a pulse oxymeter as I'm no good at finding pulses sometimes, and a bucketful more sharpies. Also stuck a small Firex in a HSGI soft taco on the side, as weight isn't a major issue on the larger pack and the two requirements may well go together.

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#7 ducttapedave

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Posted 22 March 2016 - 09:36 AM

Slick set up! I really like that bag. I've been slowing planning on expanding into a larger trauma bag. Generally what I carry is tight, compact and will help me run basic vitals and start securing for transport. 

 

The biggest stumbling block I've been running into is finding a bag system where I would be able to have proper airway support (O2, PNRB, Canula, OPA, BVM) as well as what I would like for trauma. I'm not sure that this bag would fit the bill. 

 

I like the spreadsheet a lot. Solid idea. Keep it local and keep it simple. 



#8 Corbs

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Posted 22 March 2016 - 10:47 AM

Slick set up! I really like that bag. I've been slowing planning on expanding into a larger trauma bag. Generally what I carry is tight, compact and will help me run basic vitals and start securing for transport. 
 
The biggest stumbling block I've been running into is finding a bag system where I would be able to have proper airway support (O2, PNRB, Canula, OPA, BVM) as well as what I would like for trauma. I'm not sure that this bag would fit the bill. 
 
I like the spreadsheet a lot. Solid idea. Keep it local and keep it simple.

Dave, check out their other bags, the versions of the First Responder that don't have the zip off pack do have a long pocket on one side that looks perfect for an O2 D cylinder.

Check out everything CTOMS does too, but have prepare to empty your wallet.

Edited by Corbs, 22 March 2016 - 10:48 AM.

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#9 muaddib1

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 05:40 PM

I definitely like the bag setup and the fact it can break down to two sections is a neat feature, especially if you are hiking and down need a full bag for a day hike or something.

NPAs are a very easy thing to learn and obtain and highly recommend you get at least s couple 28fr with lubrication if not a set of NPAs of varying sizes. NPAs and OPAs are fairly cheap to get and I carry both in my car kit. You can watch YouTube videos to learn how to properly use and insert them. Chest darts are also easy to learn too (also can YouTube but definitely r ecommend going through a TCCC class for more details). Definitely have at least a stethoscope and if you can fit a BP cuff that as well.

#10 ducttapedave

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Posted 27 March 2016 - 01:31 AM

Oh I've definitely been slowly checking out their stuff. The wallet may not be up to the task just yet sadly.



Dave, check out their other bags, the versions of the First Responder that don't have the zip off pack do have a long pocket on one side that looks perfect for an O2 D cylinder.

Check out everything CTOMS does too, but have prepare to empty your wallet.



#11 Corbs

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 04:32 AM

I definitely like the bag setup and the fact it can break down to two sections is a neat feature, especially if you are hiking and down need a full bag for a day hike or something.
NPAs are a very easy thing to learn and obtain and highly recommend you get at least s couple 28fr with lubrication if not a set of NPAs of varying sizes. NPAs and OPAs are fairly cheap to get and I carry both in my car kit. You can watch YouTube videos to learn how to properly use and insert them. Chest darts are also easy to learn too (also can YouTube but definitely r ecommend going through a TCCC class for more details). Definitely have at least a stethoscope and if you can fit a BP cuff that as well.

As you can imagine, I'm limited to my current training level. NPAs can cause major bleeding if forced past an obstruction, so I'm not comfortable in their use without formal certification, the same goes for a decompression needle. I do need to fit in some more vented chest seals though. As for the sphyg and stethoscope, good plan, but again need to know what you're looking for. Being confident with a stethoscope is a time learned skill. I have added a pulse oximeter.

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#12 ducttapedave

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Posted 02 April 2016 - 11:44 PM

I get what you are saying about training Corbs. I've become far more cautious about what I carry and would consider doing. I would agree with the Ears and Cuffs though. Hopefully you'll be able to get some training to add that into your kit, There's a lot of information you can get with those two pieces quickly. 



#13 GrizCo

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Posted 05 April 2016 - 06:59 AM

That is a beautiful kit! Mine is a mess and I'm going to borrow this. In all seriousness, I keep some prerolled high CBD joints in my kit (anti-anxiety, anti-nausea, anti-inflammatory, pain relief, etc. without dangerous side effects) and those bottles look more streamlined than medicine bottles.






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